Commentary

Commentary

It’s a growing phenomenon that all importers must beware: What federal agencies regulating trade once considered strictly mistakes warranting no more than a civil penalty have become criminal violations.
Fears that Europe is heading for a Japanese-style decade of snail’s pace economic growth or even stagnation are hardening into reality as the continent faces another year of recession while the rest of the world is in recovery mode.
CEO Frank Blake's discussion of Home Depot’s online strategy underscores the depth to which e-commerce is impacting the supply chains of major shippers such as those included on this week’s annual JOC ranking of Top 100 Importers and Exporters.
For every collapse, there is recovery. We’ve seen it in New Jersey and New Orleans, Tuscaloosa and Tokyo, San Francisco and Santiago. And we’ve seen it in U.S. housing markets, perhaps the single-strongest driver of today’s global containerized shipping growth.
It will be interesting to see how Wal-Mart and other companies — and today's consumers — ultimately respond to supply chain visibility issues in the wake of events such as the fire in November that leveled the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh.
With the arrival of this year’s JOC Top 100 Importers and Exporters issue, we find some constancy in our transportation world: The vast majority of companies on both lists are the same as they were last year. For many (even most) companies on both of the lists, they are the same as they’ve been for years.
It’s that time again. Time for Washington, D.C., to work itself into a tizzy about the nation’s so-called crumbling infrastructure, following the collapse of a Washington bridge over the Skagit River on Thursday.
With the retirement of Robert Kanter as director of environmental affairs and planning, the Port of Long Beach has some big shoes to fill.
As companies pursue global business expansion, their supply chains become more complex and segmented. These companies are looking to expand their business and increase competitiveness by selling and distributing finished goods in new global markets, or may be diversifying their sourcing origins to minimize disruptions to their supply chains.
A shipper’s arrangement with a broker passing itself off as a forwarder goes horribly wrong, leading to dire consequences.
The United States needs better and more sustainable discretionary grant programs in order to fund innovative transportation investments across modes. Here are 10 possible improvements to the process.
A refrigerated shipper and motor carrier get two different readings on a temperature-controlled product. Now what?
The trans-Pacific eastbound trade is taking considerably longer than in the past to settle annual service contracts that will run through next April. Some ocean carriers walked away from large deals, while others are walking into them even at rates that appear to be below costs.
More so than at any time in the past decade, forces ranging from macroeconomic trends to technology innovations are demanding transportation procurement practitioners to be part subject matter expert, part diplomat and part visionary to accomplish value creation.