Commentary

Commentary

Organizations crave more visibility into operations to make smarter business decisions and unlock potential within the value chain.
Shippers this year will continue to search for more ways to balance production and procurement with demand for sales orders.
The past year has been one of great uncertainty, from the eurozone crisis and slowing Chinese economy to the U.S. presidential election and fiscal cliff negotiations.
2012 was a rollercoaster ride, and the cards dealt for 2013 promise excitement.
Following a presidential election in which the word “outsourcing” became such a lightning rod, industry needs to do a better job of helping policy-makers understand the reality of today’s global marketplace, the central role American business plays in worldwide production and value chains, and the benefits of all this for our workers, consumers and small businesses at home.
Shippers who transport bulk commodities such as grain, coal and petroleum products up and down the
The biggest boost to U.S.
What’s ahead for the maritime industry in 2013? In a phrase — cautious optimism.
The source of energy that we may anticipate will continue to propel increasing activity at ports of Texas and beyond has been around for more than 80 million years.
This year, seaports must continue to re-analyze their ability to handle increased containerized cargo loads from larger ships, whether those ships are transiting a wider Panama Canal or serving other trade routes.
On Monday Oct. 29, the Port of New York and New Jersey was closed in anticipation of Hurricane Sandy’s winds and the 13-foot storm surge it brought with it.
Our often noisy and boisterous industry has seemed rather quiet during the past few weeks.
The closely watched unemployment rate will inch up again as layoffs at defense contractors create a ripple effect through small and medium-size companies.
Competition will be tough for anyone who isn't leveraging cloud technology in 2013.