Commentary

Commentary

A year ago, we predicted new distribution channels and emerging markets would continue to expand, along with greater supply chain flexibility, efficiency and alignment. These trends are clearly in place and continuing, as are concerns about demand volatility and supply chain risks.
Transportation is an asset-based network-operating business.
From the perspective of Wall Street, 2013 is shaping up to be another year characterized by uncertainty
The financial problems in Europe and the U.S. are accelerating a redesign of the global trade map, with new winners and losers emerging as companies develop increasingly complex supply chains.
In past essays, I may have touched on this point when discussing the economics of port operations, but I think it bears repeating, and with a bit more emphasis as our industry moves into increasingly hopeful but still challenging waters after the national economic downturn of years past.
We had another record in PC/UMS (Panama Canal Universal Measurement System) tonnage recorded during fiscal year 2012 despite a 0.95 percent decrease in transits.
While West Coast ports face a number of competitive challenges, the greatest threat may be internal and related to port governance.
Fortunately, the shipping industry has not witnessed major casualties as may have been expected.
In line with our earlier forecast, 2012 proved to be another tough environment for the container shipping industry with weak demand growth, volatile fuel prices and unsustainable freight rates for many major trade lanes.
Governments around the world are taking action to improve the external environment of their trading community by, for example, improving existing infrastructure, creating a better general business environment and enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of their national economic, institutional, regulatory and competition policies.
The inland waterways industry looks ahead to 2013 with optimism. The inland system’s locks and dams are aging rapidly, and this critically important infrastructure requires capitalization. Momentum for positive change is moving forward in Congress.
For more than 222 years, we have been America’s lifesavers. We protect people on the sea, protect against threats delivered by sea, and protect the sea itself. We’re proud of our unique service and the thousands of lives we save.
We must fight the regulatory war on business.
Q: We’re a motor carrier, and as such are very concerned about drug use by our drivers.