Commentary

Commentary

With the evolution of "3D printing," the day may be near when small retailers can produce customized orders on demand and, in the process, shorten supply chains and further reduce the need for large inventories.
Once upon a time, ocean carriers operated alone, each offering a specific type and level of service. This proved unsustainable because shippers expanded their demands for global service, shipping regulations changed, conferences were eliminated, the size and cost of vessels increased, and operational costs, especially fuel, reached record levels. In a sense, this process bears some resemblance to Sir Isaac Newton’s Third Law: Every reaction has an equal and opposite reaction.
As the threat of terrorism builds and new alerts are issued, American companies again must ask themselves how to best improve the efficiency, performance and performance within their global trade strategies.
Members of Congress and the Federal Maritime Commission seem to be targeting transportation third parties with stringent regulations. Why?
This article from the Jan. 26, 1935, issue of Traffic World often reads as if it were written yesterday, but it predates the first federal hours of service rules, which were issued in 1938. The recommendations of the National Safety Council sound quite familiar.
The higher bond requirements in MAP-21 aim to root out unscrupulous brokers. Will they work?
As cargo delays at the Port of New York and New Jersey enter their third month, customers are wondering: When will this end? Terminal operators say they expect things to settle down soon after Labor Day. That’s small comfort to port users dreading another month of expensive delays.
While professional truck drivers, trucking companies, shippers and businesses view themselves as the losers in the recent federal court ruling on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's sought-after changes to truck driver hours of service, the biggest loser in the end may be the agency itself.
It would be naïve to think the ILWU’s reputation with customers will drive its negotiating posture next year, especially when there are issues near and dear to the union’s heart that could take center stage, and possibly lead to trouble. One such issue is jurisdiction.
Export transportation can literally determine market success. Many exports are traded commodities, where the cost of transportation may be more significant to the landed cost than the actual underlying cost of the goods. Expensive transportation may exclude goods from certain markets on a competitive basis.
A recent court ruling prompts the question: What is the difference between operations of motor carriers who contract with owner-operators and brokers who contract with the motor carriers?
There are two President Obamas when it comes to infrastructure spending.
After signing its bill of lading, a shipper notices damage to a product that was concealed during offloading. What recourse does he have?
The United States' crackdown on exports of new cars bought from dealerships exposes a lack of understanding of trade law.