Commentary

Commentary

A refrigerated shipper and motor carrier get two different readings on a temperature-controlled product. Now what?
The trans-Pacific eastbound trade is taking considerably longer than in the past to settle annual service contracts that will run through next April. Some ocean carriers walked away from large deals, while others are walking into them even at rates that appear to be below costs.
More so than at any time in the past decade, forces ranging from macroeconomic trends to technology innovations are demanding transportation procurement practitioners to be part subject matter expert, part diplomat and part visionary to accomplish value creation.
The alarm bells are ringing. Maersk Line CEO Soren Skou told Lloyd’s List late last month that the industry “is at the risk of a full-fledged rate war unless the industry comes to its senses.” “Where is the bottom for container rates?” Jeffries’ Johnson Leung asked in his most recent weekly update. So what do the carriers need to do now?
The Transportation Worker Identification Credential program is broken and the Department of Homeland Security should halt it until it fully understands if it truly enhances port security.
The two political parties, with all their arguing about taxes and budgets, are consuming Washington. The Democrats advocate investing in our future, while Republicans want to avoid a future that looks like Greece.
With a new management policy, we have signed one-year “evergreen” contracts with a few motor carriers. I was told to stop preparing bills of lading and to send shipments out just with the manifests we generate from our warehouse. Is this the right thing to do?
A phrase repeated during congressional hearings and bar arguments during the early days of the Reagan administration, "If it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it must be a tax," was always a pretty good hint that someone wasn't a fan of the user-fee approach to reducing the federal budget deficit.
A veteran shipper finds that expanding into the international arena provides an entirely new set of transportation challenges.
As the long, slow economic recovery grinds on, collaboration between shippers and carriers and 3PLs is moving toward the mainstream.
In an industry increasingly driven by technology, YRC Worldwide CEO James Welch stresses the importance of LTL freight basics — including "don't bust it."
When Mexico this month announced an initiative to boost security on its highways, it was the latest step on the country’s road to becoming a world-class manufacturer. But it also served as the latest acknowledgement that to do so, it must raise security where it is so sorely lacking.
This fall, what will become the Kansas City Intermodal Facility will be a loud and busy place as BNSF’s newest intermodal terminal roars to life. But what is more noteworthy is the planned adjoining park for multiple large distribution centers.
A brief two-day trip of more than 1,000 road miles gave me the chance to see an amazing story unfolding — development of a 3,000-acre plot of land into what will be a major inland port in Minot, N.D.