Commentary

Commentary

It would be naïve to think the ILWU’s reputation with customers will drive its negotiating posture next year, especially when there are issues near and dear to the union’s heart that could take center stage, and possibly lead to trouble. One such issue is jurisdiction.
Export transportation can literally determine market success. Many exports are traded commodities, where the cost of transportation may be more significant to the landed cost than the actual underlying cost of the goods. Expensive transportation may exclude goods from certain markets on a competitive basis.
A recent court ruling prompts the question: What is the difference between operations of motor carriers who contract with owner-operators and brokers who contract with the motor carriers?
There are two President Obamas when it comes to infrastructure spending.
After signing its bill of lading, a shipper notices damage to a product that was concealed during offloading. What recourse does he have?
The United States' crackdown on exports of new cars bought from dealerships exposes a lack of understanding of trade law.
Although many in the industry have been waiting and wondering when the inevitable consolidation of ocean carriers would happen — presumably via the historical processes of buyouts, mergers or absorbing bankrupt companies — the consolidation has been happening in a much more organic process.
On July 9, U.S. Customs and Border Protection began formal enforcement of the Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements rule, or ISF, for overseas ocean containers destined for U.S. ports of entry. With potential ISF penalties now in play, significant questions are being raised.
Refrigerated transportation has come a long way from the days when Union Pacific Railroad put huge chunks of ice in boxcars to keep produce or meat from spoiling as it moved to market.
The JOC today formally introduces what we call the Port Productivity project, the result of a five-year effort to translate casual industry understanding into cold, hard numbers. The specific focus is berth productivity achieved at ports and terminals worldwide — a measurement of the speed at which container ships are unloaded, loaded and sent back to sea.
The most obvious conclusion when looking at data revealed in the launch of the JOC’s Port Productivity project is neither surprising nor unexpected: Container ports and terminals in Asia, primarily China, and the Middle East dominate their global counterparts in getting a ship, regardless of size, in and out of port as quickly as possible.
Trucking seems an unlikely candidate for technological transformation. It is, after all, literally where the rubber meets the road. But the latest changes to federal hours of service rules may be the catalyst trucking needs.
An importer of specialty goods asks about loss claims on international shipments. Would a shipper get the sales price that it would have had if the goods had been delivered?
Under the new hours of service rules, even small delays could turn a two-day trip into a three-day one, as DAT's Mark Montague demonstrates.