Commentary

Commentary

It appears the ports of California are on the verge of adopting a policy that will automatically increase costs for their tenants and customers on an annual basis, even as California ports already are losing market share.
The slow global recovery coupled with the uncertainty of European and Chinese economies have markets, corporations and consumers on edge. The blogosphere and the traditional media are abuzz with proposed remedies for the stumbling economy. Lately, the role of free trade agreements in the recovering economy seems to be one of the most discussed topics.
Obama administration to U.S. merchant marine: Drop dead. That’s the clear message from a reported plan to replace U.S. food aid and its U.S.-flag shipping requirements with a new program of cash payments for purchasing food overseas.
By nearly every measure, container shipping capacity will increase more rapidly than demand. So why are carriers predicting an increase in rates?
The relative calm of ocean transportation becomes choppy for international freight as soon as it hits land in North America.
Is the push to limit the federal government’s role worth worry about for the transportation industry?
As we wait to see whether the new International Longshoremen’s Association contract wins rank-and-file ratification, this is a good time to ask: Why were these negotiations so darn difficult?
A slow-boiling debate that’s been simmering since last year has broken out into the open: Is the container industry approaching an “inflection point” in which the balance of supply and demand shifts decisively in favor of the carriers? Despite skepticism among some leading analysts, several trends point in that direction.
2012’s container shipping rally produced rising freight rates that brought liner operators back to profitability. But with the market at another ebb, liner companies collectively must keep a cool head and resist the temptation to engage in a price war that would jeopardize a sustainable recovery.
Long-term contracts are a poor idea in today’s volatile business world. Parties should leave themselves free to reconsider contract terms in light of changing circumstances. This shipper's problem could have been alleviated.
In the month since the TPM Conference, I’ve had a chance to process what came out of the sessions and in private conversations, and here’s one of my main takeaways: Although carriers and cargo interests want to think they’re getting closer together in thought and deed, they aren’t, and the split may be getting wider.
Depending on your age, the recently announced contract between the International Longshoremen’s Association and United States Maritime Alliance could be considered “your father’s” (or grandfather’s) labor deal. Labor received wage and benefit improvements, while management achieved minimal concessions on other issues.
This week’s Government Accountability Office analysis of the Jones Act and Puerto Rico landed with a dull thud.
The hours-of-service rules proposed by the Department of Transportation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will be a disaster for the motor carrier industry. We already have enough trouble attracting qualified drivers, and the rules will hammer us further by requiring all kinds of additional “rest” times before drivers can get on the road after a shift.