Commentary

Commentary

Oakland faces a number of challenges, but a growing sense of optimism is surfacing in the trade community about the port.
The nationwide protests that have convulsed Turkey this month couldn’t have come at a worse time for the transportation sector.
In the 17 years since the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started its reconnaissance study of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, other countries have accomplished a tad more in terms of marine infrastructure projects.
There can be no other reason for the world’s three largest container lines for taking the dramatic step of proposing their uber-alliance than this: The industry is in dire condition no matter how you look at it.
If your company isn’t among the estimated 6,000 publicly traded companies on the Securities and Exchange Commission and it isn’t a supplier of tantalum, tin, tungsten or gold, or of products containing said minerals, then you could be excused to skip ahead to the next article. For the rest, you may want to continue reading for the next few minutes.
A customer refuses to allow a motor carrier to unload goods, but then claims shortages. Its managers brush off the idea of its own employees pilfering shipments. What can be done?
The homes of four of the first five presidents, located within a short drive of each other, encapsulate a dramatic time in our history and reflect some of today’s realities. Make sure this is on your travel agenda someday.
The U.S. may be getting closer to allowing Mexican trucks on its roads. What does that mean for U.S. carriers and drivers?
Our ports and surrounding infrastructure have been neglected to the point where it’s costing shippers and consignees significant money. Shippers, carriers and ports need to band together to create and deliver a message to national, state and city officials. It’s time to be heard. Who’s with me?
For a country notorious for its lack of environmental resolve, China is sure putting a large stamp on the movement with its aptly named Operation Green Fence program. Nowhere is that stamp felt more than on the largest segment of U.S. containerized exports to the Asian manufacturing giant: scrap paper, metals and plastics.
For the freight transportation industry to grow, we must strive relentlessly and responsibly to improve — ideally in a balanced fashion. Regardless of setting, we all must navigate political challenges to achieve a beneficial outcome. The public sector used to set the stage. Now it might fall to the private sector to demonstrate to our elected leaders the path forward.
Is air freight holding its own among global transport modes? Atlas Air's Michael Steen says yes. The numbers, however, say otherwise.
In the case of a lost or damaged shipment, is it possible for a shipper to profit twice on a claim?
When a motor carrier encounters repeated shortages on a shipper’s deliveries, it begins to wonder if there’s a calculated strategy involved.