Commentary

Commentary

A truck driver loses his CDL after being caught driving under the influence. Though he wasn’t working at the time, his employer fired him. Connecticut’s Supreme Court says he is entitled to unemployment compensation. Why?
The latest trend in transportation, the latest competitive tool, is a port not on the coast and not on the water either. No water — an inland port … a dry port.
In too many cases, we’ve seen government representatives state laudable goals in laws while doing little or, in some cases, working against those goals from being achieved. This unfortunately appears to be the case with the federal transportation reauthorization act, known as MAP-21, when it comes to freight policy.
The director of the upcoming Robert Redford film “All Is Lost” didn’t invent the idea that a sailboat could hit a drifting shipping container at sea. In the film, to be released Oct. 18, such an accident precipitates a dramatic life-and-death struggle when the damaged yacht with its navigation systems disabled runs into a nasty storm. But it’s hardly fiction.
Richard P. Hughes Jr. liked to recall the negotiating advice he received as a young union official from the legendary Teddy Gleason, International Longshoremen’s Association president from the 1960s to the 1980s.
After a shipment failed to reach its destination, a freight broker files a claim. The LTL carrier denied payment, saying it never received confirmation of non-delivery from the consignee. Is the broker out of luck?
It is, to say the least, one of the more disturbing images in recent ocean shipping memory: A Cosco container ship, transiting one of the world’s most important shipping arteries, when first one, then another rocket-propelled grenade is launched at the exposed vessel.
Exporting goods and services provides tremendous opportunities for small businesses, yet 99 percent of them don’t export because of bureaucracy and uncertainty. Help is available, if you know where to look.
Errors and omissions insurance is intended to protect customers against economic consequences if a provider screws up, not for willful decisions.
Most observers agree that the industry most in need of consolidation is liner shipping. Many carriers, however, participate in this industry for reasons other than pure financial gain — geopolitical concerns, mercantile interests and national security among them. The cultural barriers to be bridged are often insurmountable.
Those of us who regularly read shipping industry reports from around the world must endure a mix of emotions when reading the news of the day. Some days, we smile. Others, we may shed a tear. And then there the days of bewilderment. And that was my reaction when reading on a late-summer day in August that truckers had shut down the Port of Oakland over alleged issues with the port and terminal operators.
Any company that depends on unobstructed international supply chains to serve its customers in the U.S. or abroad should appreciate the profound victory that came last week in a federal court’s order permanently barring the Port of Los Angeles from enforcing the so-called employee-driver mandate.
With the Cosco Asia the target of an unsuccessful "terrorist" attack on Aug. 31 while transiting the Suez Canal, the global trading and international policy communities need to pause and reflect on the consequences of a successful armed attack on the canal, a critical artery of world trade.
The summer of discontent rocking the ports of Oakland and New York-New Jersey shines a bright light on the fragility of marine terminals in an era of big ships, automation, worker protests and environmental pressures.