Commentary

Commentary

At a time when our nation’s “reset” with Russia has fallen victim to an increasingly frosty relationship between presidents Obama and Putin, it’s easy to wax nostalgic about better days. During the 1985 Geneva summit between President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev, Reagan remarked that if the earth faced an invasion by extraterrestrials, the U.S. and the Soviet Union would join forces to repel such an invasion.
A motor carrier official laments the FMCSA’s “increasingly intrusive” regulations that soon may require carriers to monitor drivers for sleep apnea. When is enough enough, he asks.
Leggett & Platt, the sprawling manufacturing and consumer products company, had little idea of what it was getting into when it hired Maik Breckwoldt out of the automotive industry in 2005 as its vice president for logistics.
Capt. Richard Phillips knew the risks. A merchant seaman for 30 years and ship captain for nearly 20, the man at the helm of the Maersk Alabama has been forthright about the dangers his ship faced in sailing the pirate-infested waters off Somalia half a decade ago.
A recent report about September’s South Carolina International Trade Conference, where shippers expressed concern that bigger container ships and larger carrier alliances will leave them with fewer options, sparked some quick thoughts, my first being, “You got what you asked for.”
Can a broker’s or 3PL’s employees book a hazardous materials shipment without being certified to do so?
With the federal government shut down — the latest example of a dysfunctional Congress — progress toward passing a major port and inland waterway authorization bill is a rare glimmer of bipartisanship.
Supply chain management is receiving increasing attention within corporate boardrooms, and academia is responding with new specialized degree programs targeting existing and future supply chain managers.
If I see another article about near-shoring, which I expect will happen within the next few days, I may get sick. This is one of the most sensationalized stories of recent years and yet I’ve always been troubled by it, sensing the headline is bigger than the story.
A small freight broker questions the legality of tendering a shipment to Carrier A, who then tenders it to Carrier B, if Carrier A has a broker’s license and provides the name of the carrier it’s tendering to.
With global economies on the mend, stock markets roiled with volatility and consumer confidence struggling to improve, ocean shipping volumes have been relatively flat. In such an environment, carriers’ classic methods of raising prices through new services or product features are probably unavailable.
A truck driver loses his CDL after being caught driving under the influence. Though he wasn’t working at the time, his employer fired him. Connecticut’s Supreme Court says he is entitled to unemployment compensation. Why?
The latest trend in transportation, the latest competitive tool, is a port not on the coast and not on the water either. No water — an inland port … a dry port.
In too many cases, we’ve seen government representatives state laudable goals in laws while doing little or, in some cases, working against those goals from being achieved. This unfortunately appears to be the case with the federal transportation reauthorization act, known as MAP-21, when it comes to freight policy.