Commentary

Commentary

The Port of Long Beach is not the only West Coast container port that is beginning the process of finding a new executive director.
Should a motor carrier be concerned when a bill of lading has a clause “Where the rate is dependent upon value” and the declared amount is much higher than its rate agreement allows?
With new free trade agreements popping up all over the world, companies could be missing out on cost savings because of the common notion that FTA qualifications are difficult and time-consuming. Taking a proactive approach can lead to simple processes and automated workflows to manage multiple agreements.
In his Aug. 5 Journal of Commerce article, “Decline of the Single-User Terminal,” Bill Mongelluzzo describes how vessel operators are eliminating their proprietary terminal operations in favor of using public terminals. They may or may not know it, but by embracing the public option these operators are increasing port resilience.
A truck gets stuck in a storm and ultimately a flood that causes a total loss of a high-value load. Is the carrier liable?
If you want perspective on life, talk with a centenarian.
The evolution of the U.S. container port system hasn’t gone exactly as planned, and Congress should bear that in mind when considering project funding.
Los Angeles-Long Beach handles some 40 percent of U.S. containerized imports, but what happens to that cargo once it lands is undergoing fundamental change, reflecting larger trends in U.S. freight transportation.
If we can put a man on the moon, why’s it so hard to fix the congestion at the Port of New York and New Jersey?
With the evolution of "3D printing," the day may be near when small retailers can produce customized orders on demand and, in the process, shorten supply chains and further reduce the need for large inventories.
Once upon a time, ocean carriers operated alone, each offering a specific type and level of service. This proved unsustainable because shippers expanded their demands for global service, shipping regulations changed, conferences were eliminated, the size and cost of vessels increased, and operational costs, especially fuel, reached record levels. In a sense, this process bears some resemblance to Sir Isaac Newton’s Third Law: Every reaction has an equal and opposite reaction.
As the threat of terrorism builds and new alerts are issued, American companies again must ask themselves how to best improve the efficiency, performance and performance within their global trade strategies.
Members of Congress and the Federal Maritime Commission seem to be targeting transportation third parties with stringent regulations. Why?
This article from the Jan. 26, 1935, issue of Traffic World often reads as if it were written yesterday, but it predates the first federal hours of service rules, which were issued in 1938. The recommendations of the National Safety Council sound quite familiar.