Electronic Logging Device Mandate

Shipping and logistics news and analysis of the US electronic logging device (ELD) mandate that takes effect December 18, 2017, and its impact on trucking rates and capacity.

The ELD mandate is a regulation that says US truckers and trucking companies must record driver's hours of service digitally and cease use of paper logs to track drivers' time behind the wheel.

Special Coverage

A truck travels on a US road.
After two years in an economic rut, US trucking accelerated in 2017, led by less-than-truckload carriers before truckload carriers merged into the same fast lane later in the year.

News & Analysis

Trucks travel on a US highway.
19 Oct 2018
The trucking effects from the extreme weather the Southeast US experienced are expected to be temporary, with strong pre-holiday demand in November and possibly December likely to restore “balance” in the storm’s wake.
Trucks travel on a highway in near Toronto, Canada.
19 Oct 2018
The electronic logging device rule imposed in the United States in November has already affected Canadian trucking, both cross-border and domestic services.
A truck travels in the United States.
16 Oct 2018
After a year of double-digit increases, spot rate gains are slowing, and truck rates and revenue increases are expected to ‘moderate’ to the mid-single-digit range in 2019.
Trucks travel on a US highway.
15 Oct 2018
US trucking has entered a new era, in which a ‘new normal’ has been established. Even so, for shippers, there are some encouraging sector developments concerning driver recruitment and overall truck capacity.
An intermodal travels through California, United States.
10 Oct 2018
This has been a record year for US intermodal rail, but changes in shipping patterns apparently have lowered the autumn intermodal peak — or broken it into two smaller peaks.
A truck travels in South Dakota, United States.
08 Oct 2018
For those who think that it’s somehow counterintuitive to have a pricing model designed to create a loss or to reduce operating margins, rest assured, it is.

Commentary

What will the US trucking capacity situation be in five years? Will it be tighter than today, looser, or about the same? A show of hands to those questions at a panel — which I moderated at the Council of Supply Chain Management Professional’s 2018 Edge Conference — revealed most expect further tightness come 2023. Fundamentally, yours truly does not fully agree. 

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