Electronic Logging Device Mandate

Electronic Logging Device Mandate

Shipping and logistics news and analysis of the US electronic logging device (ELD) mandate that takes effect December 18, 2017, and its impact on trucking rates and capacity.

The ELD mandate is a regulation that says US truckers and trucking companies must record driver's hours of service digitally and cease use of paper logs to track drivers' time behind the wheel.

Special Coverage

A truck travels on a US road.
After two years in an economic rut, US trucking accelerated in 2017, led by less-than-truckload carriers before truckload carriers merged into the same fast lane later in the year.

News & Analysis

Trucks travel in the United States.
13 Dec 2018
The electronic logging device transition period has passed and the trucking industry has found a new normal. On the rails, intermodal volume has grown each week, year over year, except week one. What do the aforementioned mean for rates and capacity for each?
A truck travels in the United States.
13 Dec 2018
“Absent a rebound this week, the anticipated holiday peak for van freight appears to be muted,” DAT said in a statement. Even so, another feature of the US economy continues to bode well for freight demand.
A truck travels on a US highway.
07 Dec 2018
The FMCSA published 10 decisions rejecting petitions for ELD exemptions Friday, a sign the agency has drawn a sharp line when it comes to pleas for relief from the year-old rule. Instead, expect more focus on the hours of service rules themselves.
A truck travels on a US highway.
07 Dec 2018
Echo Global Logistics CEO Doug Waggoner expects a ‘healthy’ freight market in 2019, but he said shippers should watch inventory levels for a pertinent reason.
Port Tampa Bay credit Port Tampa Bay.
05 Dec 2018
The new service highlights a state-wide effort to attract cargo destined for Florida but that moves through other gateways.
A truck travels on a US road.
04 Dec 2018
The ‘truce’ between the United States and China that delays a new 25 percent US tariff until March 1 may substantially change the first-quarter US transportation landscape.

Commentary

What will the US trucking capacity situation be in five years? Will it be tighter than today, looser, or about the same? A show of hands to those questions at a panel — which I moderated at the Council of Supply Chain Management Professional’s 2018 Edge Conference — revealed most expect further tightness come 2023. Fundamentally, yours truly does not fully agree. 

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