Commentary

Commentary

Disruption seen in the durable goods supply chain has devastated capacity and equipment supplies in the north–south trades in perishables, leaving growers with no vessel space and late-arriving cold chain perishables decaying on the docks.
Because freight moves through local, national, continental, and international networks, the federal government must take leadership in solving some of the current supply chain conundrums.
In today’s brittle supply chain, shippers must be able to plan for unexpected changes, shift resources, and communicate revised timelines at a moment’s notice.
Parcel providers are missing out by not recognizing that consumers will pay for customized delivery to suit the unique attributes of the products and their lifestyles.
“The road to Hell is paved with g
The recent death of Sen. Robert D
The only time transportation focuses the public’s attention is when something goes wrong. We have been betrayed by leaders – public and private – who avoided tough decisions necessary for long-term sufficiency in favor of short-term results.
The Container Excess Dwell Fees certainly don’t pass the scrutiny of the FMC’s incentive principle contained in its interpretive rules for demurrage and detention.
Importers shouldn’t be on the hook for port demurrage when they can’t remove containers.
A three-way intersection on the horizon, where serverless, SaaS, and open-source platforms collide, will hasten this ongoing revolution we’re seeing take place.
Most parcel shippers are painfully aware since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic that along with higher costs for transp