TRANSPORT BRIEFS

TRANSPORT BRIEFS

TRANSPORTATION CHIEF

RESIGNS IN OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA CITY - The director of the state Transportation Department is resigning effective Sept. 30 to return to private business.

Jack Crowley, who was appointed by then-Gov. David Walters in 1993, announced his plans Tuesday. He said he had been considering leaving for three or four months.

Mr. Crowley said now is the logical time for him to return to private business.

"The next area of revolutionary change in transportation will be funding, where everything from tribal gas to federal budget balancing will alter the

financial landscapes," he said.

Mr. Crowley is president and owner of Urbantech Inc. of Tulsa, an urban planning and development firm.

A spokesman for Gov. Frank Keating, said the resignation was a surprise to the governor's office and that the governor doesn't have a replacement in mind.

NORTH KOREA SEEKS

AID FOR FLOOD DAMAGE

SEOUL, South Korea - Impoverished North Korea, already beset by serious food shortages, said recent floods have affected 5.2 million people and caused $15 billion in damage, the United Nations said Wednesday.

Madeleine Moulin-Acevedo of the U.N. Department of Humanitarian Affairs in Geneva said North Korea has sought aid for the first time from her department. It wants emergency food and medicine, along with help rebuilding roads, railways and communication links.

A team of four - a department official and disaster relief experts from Sweden, Denmark and Finland - were to begin assessing the damage, Ms. Moulin- Acevedo said.

FAA HANDBOOK OFFERS

SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration unveiled a new guidebook that offers ways for airline maintenance technicians, managers and safety inspectors to reduce the errors that compromise safety and add to the overall cost of maintaining aircraft. The guidebook is the culmination of five years of FAA research that included the participation of major U.S. airlines and aircraft manufacturers.

"Human Factors Guide for Aviation Maintenance," also available in CD-ROM, is free from the FAA's Office of Aviation Medicine in the computer format, or offered by the Government Printing Office at nominal cost. The book version will be available in October. The FAA is planning to hold several workshops at aircraft maintenance facilities to familiarize workers with the application and use of the guidebook.

HEAD OF AMERICA WEST

RETIRING AT END OF YEAR

PHOENIX - A. Maurice Myers, who helped America West Airlines emerge from bankruptcy protection last year and back to profitability, announced he will retire on Dec. 31.

Mr. Myers, 55, has been the Phoenix-based carrier's president and chief operating officer since January 1994. He said he was exercising his early retirement option.

William A. Franke will continue with the airline as chairman and chief executive officer and will assume Mr. Myers' responsibilities until a successor is selected, according to the company, which said a search for Mr. Myers' replacement will begin immediately.

HOUSTON, PHILA. AIRPORTS

FACE BOMB SCARE THREATS

HOUSTON - Bomb scares at airports in Houston and Philadelphia canceled one flight and forced the closing of an access road and a baggage terminal Tuesday, one day after another threat closed New York's three airports.

In Houston, police searched a plane for weapons after a woman told a Southwest Airlines ticket agent at Hobby Airport that she had guns, hand grenades and a bomb in a box she was carrying as she boarded a flight to New Orleans.

The woman was subsequently caught and jailed and will likely face federal charges of making a terroristic threat and state charges of making a false alarm even though the weapons search came up empty.

At Philadelphia International Airport, police closed an access road and a baggage terminal for several hours while a bomb squad investigated a suspicious rental truck, a police officer said.

The airport remained open, and police later said their checks had found nothing.