TRANSPORT BRIEFS

TRANSPORT BRIEFS

EUROPEAN AIR TRAFFIC

ROSE AGAIN IN OCTOBER

BRUSSELS - European airlines boosted passenger traffic in October for the fifth month in a row but strikes at French airports slowed the rate of increase in air freight.

The Association of European Airlines said Wednesday its 24 member carriers boosted passenger traffic by 6.7 percent and freight by 2.7 percent.

European passenger traffic was 7.8 percent higher but North Atlantic business grew only 3.2 percent after a 10 percent jump in September.

The lower growth in air freight following two months of double-digit increases largely stemmed from strikes at Paris and other French airports to protest a plan to lay off 4,000 workers at Air France.

Freight declined on African and Latin American services and there was only marginal growth on the previously booming Far Eastern routes.

TWA PLANS LAYOFFS

AT MAINTENANCE BASE

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Trans World Airlines plans to lay off 137 workers at its maintenance base here because it lost contracts to maintain jets for two other airlines, a spokesman said.

The notices will be mailed Dec. 15 and will be effective Jan. 3.

Layoffs will be based on seniority, said Jerry Cosley, a spokesman.

TWA recently lost the contract for maintenance on United Parcel Service jets. But most of the layoffs are attributed to Hawaiian Airlines plans to stop flying seven Lockheed L-1011 jets that TWA has been maintaining.

GERMANS COMPROMISE

ON RAILROAD REFORM

BONN, Germany - The federal and state governments agreed Wednesday to postpone the regionalization of railroad passenger transport by one year but to implement a federal reform program on Jan. 1, a spokesman for the Finance Ministry said.

The regionalization will now take place Jan. 1, 1996. In 1995, the federal government will spend the 7.7 billion deutsche marks on the regional rail operations, the spokesman said.

The compromise will allow the federal government to turn the railroads into a stock company on Jan. 1. The federal government will be the only shareholder.

The states had indicated their willingness to take over the regional railroad passenger traffic, but balked at the costs and demanded that Bonn contribute more to the states.

CF MOTOR FREIGHT

JOINS CHEMICAL GROUP

MENLO PARK, Ca. - CF Motor Freight, one of the nation's largest trucking companies, has joined the Chemical Manufacturers Association's Responsible Care Partnership Program.

The program seeks to ensure that the strictest health, safety and environmental measures are followed in the transportation of chemicals.

Robert H. Lawrence, president and chief executive of CF Motor Freight, said the company "is committed to developing the safest chemical-handling methods in the industry."

AMERICAN AIRLINES

TO LEAVE FARGO IN '94

FARGO, N.D. - American Airlines announced Tuesday it will eliminate service between Fargo and Chicago on Jan. 30 because the route is not profitable.

Edward Faberman, the airline's vice president, said American is losing about $350,000 a month on its Fargo operation. He said American has been unable to compete with Northwest Airlines, the main carrier in the region, and the only other airline offering jet service to

Fargo.

"As a result of the dominating market presence of competitors in the Fargo market, American has not been able to add the passengers necessary to make our flights profitable," Mr. Faberman said in a prepared statement.

The pullout had been rumored for months. American announced in late summer that it was pulling out of Sioux Falls, S.D., and cutting thousands of jobs around the country.

STEPHENS TRUCK LINES

PAYS FINE, ICC SAYS

WASHINGTON - The Interstate Commerce Commission announced that Stephens Truck Lines Inc., of Bossier City, La., paid a $2,500 civil fine for violations of federal rules regarding owner-operators.

In agreeing to the settlement, the ICC said the company would comply with rules pertaining to written leases, tariff publication and notification of creditors.