PROTESTERS GO TO GREAT HEIGHTS TO PROTEST CHLORINE USE IN PAPER

PROTESTERS GO TO GREAT HEIGHTS TO PROTEST CHLORINE USE IN PAPER

Two Greenpeace activists scaled the Georgia-Pacific headquarters building in downtown Atlanta Monday to protest the use of chlorine in the company's paper products.

The two, identified by Greenpeace as D.J. LaChappelle, 24, of Washington, D.C., and Laurel Greenberg, 31, of Boston, used climbing equipment to scale about 150 feet up the skyscraper and unfurled a banner reading "Take The Poison Out of Pulp." Greenpeace contends the use of chlorine to bleach paper produces the dangerous chemical dioxin.Atlanta police Sgt. P.J. Lynn said they would be arrested once they climbed down, but there were no plans to go up and get them. An ambulance and a rescue unit were standing by, and police blocked off a side street next to the building.

"They're in hot water. They will be arrested when they come down," said Sgt. Lynn, adding that the charges would be criminal trespass and reckless conduct.

About 200 bystanders, many of them office workers on the way to their jobs, stopped to watch the protest when it began during the morning rush hour.

Greenpeace spokesman Brian Hunt said Mr. LaChappelle and Ms. Greenberg, who were clinging to a cable, planned to stay up on the building until this afternoon, when the Environmental Protection Agency planned a news conference in Washington to announce its findings on dioxins in bleached paper.

In Washington, EPA officials who spoke on condition of anonymity said the report concludes that the amount of cancer-causing dioxins in items like milk cartons and toilet tissues is too small to pose a health hazard to consumers, but the agency is concerned about dioxin contamination of waterways near some paper mills.

Mr. Hunt said Greenpeace chose Georgia-Pacific's building for the protest

because the Atlanta-based company is the biggest pulp mill operator in the nation.