PRODUCTS MARKETPLACE

PRODUCTS MARKETPLACE

LEAD PRODUCTS

Synthetic Products Co. of Cleveland announced that it will increase prices of its Anzon lead products effective March 1, 1990.The company will increase list and market prices of its Dyphos, Tribase and Dythal powdered products by 5 cents a pound, and prices of its Envirostrand and specialty grade products by 10 cents a pound.

The company cited higher lead metal prices and investment costs, and more stringent government regulations as the reasons for the price increase.

COATING RESINS, EPOXY ESTERS

Reichhold Chemicals Inc.'s Coating Polymers & Resins division said it will increase prices of solvent-based coating resins and epoxy esters, effective March 12, 1990.

The increases are as follows:

Solvent-based coating resins, 1 cent a pound; flat alkyds, 1.5 cents a pound; medium oil alkyds, 1.5 cents a pound; short oil alkyds, 2 cents a pound; copolymers, 1.5 cents a pound; modified alkyds, 1.5 cents a pound; oil modified urethanes, 1 cent a pound.

Epoxy esters proces will be raised 1.5 cents a pound, saturated polyesters 1.5 cents a pound, and specialty coating resins, between 1.5 cents and 3 cents a pound.

Escalation of prices for solvents and other raw materials were cited as the reasons for this increase.

The Coating Polymers & Resins division of Reichhold produces resins for architectural and industrial coatings and produces a wide range of specialty resins for use in adhesives, inks and paper.

Reichhold, headquartered in White Plains, N.Y., produces adhesives and polymers primarily for the coatings, adhesives, paper, graphic arts and plastics markets.

LATEXES AND PLASTIC PIGMENTS

Dow Chemical Co. of Midland, Mich., has announced a price increase of 3.5 cents a pound for its styrene-butadiene latexes and plastic pigments used in the paper and paperboard markets.

The increase is effective April 1.

SULFATES AND SULFONATES

Effective April 1, Stepan Co. will increase the price of all its sulfates and sulfonates by 2 cents a pound.

Stepan, based in Northfield, Ill., said the price increase was needed

because of the constantly accelerating cost of complying with environmental regulations.