STUDY: US EXECUTIVES LESS STRESSED THAN EUROPEANS

STUDY: US EXECUTIVES LESS STRESSED THAN EUROPEANS

Pity the European business executive. He has job security, but he's stressed out.

European executives have higher levels of stress overall than U.S. executives, according to a survey by Ray & Berndtson, Fort Worth, and Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.''The pressures on executives, just like skills required for success, are becoming the same around the world,'' said Paul Ray Jr., chief executive of Ray & Berndtson, a company that recruits executives and top professionals around the world.

The study found that U.S. and European executives are facing remarkably similar job demands. One major difference was that U.S. executives have a greater need to influence peers in other units or divisions of the company.

Another significant difference was that U.S. executives were more than twice as likely to say that their job put them under constant pressure - 42 percent, compared to only 20 percent of Europeans.

The highest challenge for both groups, cited by nearly four in five, was that success or failure would be evident to higher management.

''Multinational companies are far more complex to manage, and issues related to that diversity are clearly increasing the demands made of executives,'' Mr. Ray said. ''What's more, their actions have become highly visible.''

Apart from job insecurity, U.S. executives have less stress than European executives from office politics, time spent in meetings, number of projects, conflicting demands, time spent at work, and red tape.