MARITIME BRIEFS

MARITIME BRIEFS

US-HAITI FREIGHT RATES

WILL INCREASE JUNE 1HOLLYWOOD, Fla. - A group of shipping lines said it will raise freight rates between the United States and Haiti on June 1.

Rates will rise by $150 a 20-foot container and $200 for each container larger than 20 feet long, said the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Hispaniola Steamship Freight Association. Weight and measure rates will be rounded off to the next highest one dollar per unit.

The group is made up of Crowley Caribbean Transport, Sea-Land Service Inc., Puerto Rico Maritime Shipping Authority and Crowley Trailer Marine Transport.

CARRIER CHANGES NAME

TO AVOID CONFUSION

ISELIN, N.J. - BCSL U.S.-Med. Line Ltd. is the new name of the shipping line formerly called BCL U.S.-Med. Line Ltd.

The carrier, a unit of London-based British Continental Shipping Line, said it added the "S" to its name in order to avoid confusion with Bermuda Container Line, an unrelated shipping company that uses the initials BCL.

BCSL U.S.-Med. Line offers service between the U.S. East Coast, Israel and Turkey.

SOUTH KOREA TO JOIN

SHIPBUILDING COMMITTEE

PARIS - South Korea soon will join the shipbuilding committee of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, an OECD diplomat said late last week.

The Asian country has been a member of the so-called liaison group with the OECD Working Party No. 6 for some time, and is part of negotiations to phase out shipbuilding subsidies in industrialized countries. Formal procedures are all that stand in the way of Korea's membership of the committee, the official said.

In contrast to the OECD codes on capital movements and foreign

investments, the agreement would be binding and "could serve as a model for future accords on other issues," the official said. OECD ministers will mention the subsidy negotiations in the communique after their two-day annual meeting this week, welcoming progress and calling for a pact to be signed as soon as possible.

NO CRIMINAL LIABILITY

FOUND IN NAVY TRIAL

SAN DIEGO - A military judge ruled that the former skipper of the destroyer USS Kinkaid was not criminally liable for a collision with a merchant vessel that killed one crewman and injured five others.

After an eight-day court-martial, the judge, Capt. Richard Reed, acquitted Cmdr. John Cochrane of negligence and dereliction of duty in the Nov. 12 accident off the Malay Peninsula.

Cmdr. Cochrane had faced up to two years' confinement and dismissal from the Navy.

The judge noted that a Navy skipper's duty to see to the safe navigation of his ship and well-being of his crew differs from criminal liability, which demands proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

VENEZUELA CONFERENCE

TO RAISE RATES 15 PERCENT

JERSEY CITY, N.J. - Five ship lines sailing between the U.S. East Coast and Venezuela plan to raise freight rates an average of 15 percent on July 1.

A statement issued by the U.S. Atlantic/Venezuela Freight Conference attributed the rate hike to substantial increases in cargo-handling expenses, vessel costs, salaries and other costs, combined with "reduced productivity in certain scheduled ports."

Coinciding with the increase, the conference will convert its tariff to the metric system and convert all lump-sum container rates to rates based on weight.

As previously reported, freight rates between Venezuela and the U.S. Gulf are slated to rise by an average of 17.5 percent on June 1. The conference serving that range also is converting its tariff to metric.

The U.S. Atlantic/Venezuela Freight Conference is comprised of American Transport Lines Inc., Conaven, King Ocean Lines, Maragua Line and Cia. Venezolana de Navegacion.

SENATE PANEL APPROVES

ZEBRA MUSSEL CONTROL

WASHINGTON - A Senate environment committee authorized nearly $40 million in project grants and research funding to control zebra mussels, a navigation hazard, in the United States.

The mussels attach themselves to almost any stable surface, such as boat hulls, drinking water intakes, hydroelectric conduits and other machinery. As they multiply and build up on those surfaces, they can affect navigation and diminish the flow capacity of water intakes.

Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., chairman of the Subcommittee on Water Resources, said the problems presented by the zebra mussel "will be the environmental issue of the 1990s."

CREWS CLEAN UP SPILL

NEAR NEW ORLEANS PORT

NEW ORLEANS - Cleanup crews spent the weekend mopping up about 6,000 barrels of crude oil that stretched 40 miles downstream from the Port of New Orleans following a barge-freighter collision at one of the sharpest turns in the Mississippi River.

The 812-foot Stonewall Jackson was headed downstream in swift currents Thursday evening when it failed to negotiate the Algiers Point turn in the heart of New Orleans. The vessel slammed into a fleet of barges tied up at the Waterman Steamship Corp.'s fleeting facility, a Coast Guard spokesman said.

Seven barges were damaged, but did not sink, Coast Guard Lt. Patrick Philbin said. The freighter, also owned by Waterman, suffered extensive damage.

GLOBAL SERVICES CITED

FOR REDUCING ACCIDENTS

NEW YORK - Global Terminal & Container Services, Jersey City, N.J., was among six companies cited by the New York Shipping Association May 10 for significantly reducing the number of worker accidents during 1989.

The association issued a supplementary announcement adding Global's name to the other five companies that were cited in a statement issued earlier this month.

MAERSK ESTABLISHES

SOUTH KOREAN OFFICES

Maersk Line said it established dedicated offices in two South Korean cities under the name, Maersk Korea Ltd.

The new offices in Seoul and Busan are linked to the Danish-owned steamship line's satellite-based communication network, Maersk said.