JOSEPH BONNEY'S INSIDE TALK ON SHIPPING

JOSEPH BONNEY'S INSIDE TALK ON SHIPPING

A CAREER PATH to admiral in the Navy used to require attendance at the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., but that seems to be changing.

Of the 31 names in the current list of nominees for admiral, only 14 are Naval Academy graduates. The rest attended a variety of other colleges, such as Rhode Island, Ohio State, Williams, Notre Dame, Rensselaer and Massachusetts Maritime Academy.Massachusetts Maritime Academy boasts three of the current nominees - Capts. William J. Flanagan Jr. (class of 1964), Maurice J. Bresnahan Jr. and John A. Moriarty (both class of 1969). That will bring to seven the number of admirals produced by the small state-run college on Cape Cod.

The Massachusetts academy says it now ranks second only to Annapolis in producing future admirals.

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JOBS ARE SCARCE in shipping, but the New York State Maritime College reports that 92 percent of its graduates last year found jobs soon after graduation and that 71 percent of those found employment in some maritime field.

By maritime fields, the school includes shipboard or land-based jobs in the merchant marine or commissions in the Navy.

Anthony Palmiotti, director of placement for the school, said the figures were better than he expected, considering the dismal state of the U.S.-flag shipping industry.

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THE LATEST EVIDENCE of the decline of U.S. shipbuilding came with Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s decision to sell its shipyards in Beaumont and Port Arthur, Texas, along with another one in Singapore.

David H. Klinges, president of the company's marine construction group, notes that today, over 90 percent of American shipyards are supported by Navy work. Without commercial work, naval construction cannot support the industry.

He says that within the last five years alone, the number of shipyards has declined to 69 from 105, and that industry employment shrank to 80,000, from 112,000.