IMPORT BRIEFS

IMPORT BRIEFS

DUMPING PROBE SET

ON EQUIPMENT IMPORTSThe International Trade Commission cleared the way Tuesday for dumping probes of imports of laser light-scattering instruments from Japan and phototypesetting and imagesetting machines from West Germany.

The commission found in both cases an "indication" that the imports are causing or threatening material injury to U.S. manufacturers of the items.

Wyagtt Technology Corp., Santa Barbara, Calif., has alleged that imports

from Japan of laser light-scattering instruments and parts are being sold at less than fair value and thereby harming its business.

Tegra Inc., Billerica, Mass., and its subsidiary, Varityper Inc., East Hanover, N.J., filed a similar complaint against imports of the West German phototypesetting and imagesetting machines and subassemblies.

As a result of the commission's findings, the Commerce Department will launch pricing probes of the Japanese and West German products. A final department report in each case is due by Aug. 27.

If Commerce finds sales at less than fair value, the commission will make a final ruling oninjury. If it confirms injury, anti-dumping duties would be assessed on the imports.

IRISH CRYSTAL WORKERS

VOW TO CONTINUE STRIKE

DUBLIN, Ireland - The workers who make Ireland's world-renowned Waterford crystal have voted unanimously to continue their 4-week-old strike at the debt-ridden firm.

The 2,300 workers at Waterford Wedgwood's three plants went on strike over management cost- cutting plans when the company stopped bonus payments for 500 glass cutters.

Paddy Galvin, Waterford's chief executive, said in a statement he wanted to meet union leaders "to try to resolve a highly dangerous and traumatic impasse."

The crystal and china group has been hard hit by a slump in crucial U.S. and British markets.

CAR IMPORTER SUED

FOR SAFETY VIOLATIONS

BUFFALO, N.Y. - The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a $543,000 lawsuit against a Buffalo car importer, charging the company with failing to comply with federal safety standards.

The suit alleges that Superior Auto Sales Inc. did not install proper passenger safety restraints, such as seat belts and air bags, in cars the company has imported since 1986.

The suit, which was filed Monday in federal court in Buffalo, was brought on behalf of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The suit is the first of its type to address those specific violations of safety laws, officials said.

Federal regulations issued in 1984 require manufacturers and importers of foreign cars to install passive safety requirements.

ST. VINCENT HAS SPACE

FOR US FACTORIES

WASHINGTON - St. Vincent and the Grenadines is urging U.S. companies to take advantage of an additional 20,000 square feet of factory space scheduled to become available by September, according to the Eastern Caribbean Investment Promotion Service in here.

Ecips said it will work with the Development Corporation of St. Vincent and the Grenadines to help attract U.S. companies to the islands.