BRIEFS

BRIEFS

INDIAN IMPORTERS GET

OK TO RE-EXPORT SUGARNEW DELHI - The Indian government is allowing sugar importers to re-export sugar that had arrived in Indian ports and is awaiting customs clearance.

Importers will now have the freedom to re-export such sugar without obtaining permission from the government.

The government made some changes in export and import trade rules on Monday.

TAIWAN, US DISCUSS

MEAT IMPORT STANDARDS

TAIPEI - Taiwan trade officials were to meet Tuesday with David Burns, U.S. trade representative senior adviser, on the formulation of standards for local traders applying for quotas for Taiwan's upcoming commencement of U.S. meat imports, an official from the Board of Foreign Trade said.

Mr. Burns is in Taiwan to meet with local officials mainly to review Taiwan's efforts in the past year on intellectual property rights protection issues.

Taiwan will allow the import of 5,000 metric tons of pork bellies, 7,500 metric tons of pig offals and 10,000 metric tons of chicken from the United States annually, prior to its entry into the World Trade Organization, in an accord struck in bilateral trade talks with the United States which ended Feb. 20.

The Board of Foreign Trade official said the local meat industry has asked the government to allow only traders in the meat industry to apply for the import quota, although the United States prefers Taiwan not to set any limit on the qualification.

The official said the U.S concern is that local meat traders will be reluctant to import meat from the United States and that this will have a negative impact on U.S. meat exports to Taiwan.

RUSSIA'S 'NEW RUBLES'

REACH 69 PERCENT OF CIRCULATION

MOSCOW - The Central Bank of Russia introduced into circulation 92.9 billion worth of new ruble bills between Jan. 1 and April 13 and withdrew 97.7 billion worth of old ruble bills, the bank's press service said in a statement Tuesday.

The re-denominated rubles now amount to 69.3 percent of the money in circulation, the statement said.

The introduction of the new bills is part of the re-denomination of the ruble in which three zeros have been slashed from the old bills.

Re-denomination started Jan. 1 and will continue until year-end, but old bills will remain valid until 2000.

US WARNS CHINA: TRADE

DEFICIT MAY AFFECT SUMMIT

BEIJING - The United States warned Beijing Tuesday that its gaping trade deficit with China is a growing blot on improving relations and could affect a presidential summit slated for late June.

''The increasing deficit - since 1990 a more than five-fold increase - has cast a growing shadow on an otherwise bright future,'' said U.S. Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade David Aaron.

''If left unattended, the growing imbalance in our trade relationship could even have a somber impact on the summit,'' he told a meeting of the American Chamber of Commerce in Beijing.

President Clinton is due in Beijing in late June to follow up on a state visit by Chinese President Jiang Zemin to Washington last year.