AMERICAN PRESIDENT COS. SHAKE-UP HIGHLIGHTS FOUR EXECUTIVES

AMERICAN PRESIDENT COS. SHAKE-UP HIGHLIGHTS FOUR EXECUTIVES

The four key players involved in the recent American President Cos. management shake-up are among the highest-profile executives in the two principal APC divisions.

As reported earlier, Donald Orris, 48, resigned suddenly as president of American President Domestic, paving the way for several changes within APD and American President Lines Ltd.Timothy J. Rhein, who was just named APD's president and chief executive, has been APL's president and chief operating officer since 1987.

Mr. Rhein is seen as a hard charging executive who rose quickly through the company ranks to become president of APL within 20 years of joining the company. He has a forceful presence, can be tough on subordinates, and has a high profile in the industry. He played a key role in the formation of the Transpacific Discussion Agreement.

Mr. Rhein came to the commercial transportation industry from the U.S. Army where he helped build Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam, now a Soviet naval base. He said he first joined APL rather than Matson Navigation on his return from Asia in 1967 because the pay was $25 higher.

From 1983 to 1987, Mr. Rhein was senior vice president of marketing and logistics. Before that he also served as North American vice president, vice president of logistics and vice president of marketing. Mr. Rhein had a salary of $269,693 and options on 2,500 shares at an average of $35 a share in 1989, or about $87,500, according to public documents.

George Hayashi, 50, former vice chairman of APC's board, will head APL. Mr. Hayashi is well liked within the company and is an avid golfer. He first joined the company in 1964 as a purser trainee aboard one of the passenger ships and worked his way up in the company.

Even his first job with the company underscored his ability to get along with people, one insider said. "He was in third class handling baggage where you have 400 people stuck in a small area," he said.

In January 1989 Mr. Hayashi was elected vice chairman with responsibility for meeting with key clients, and some saw a change in the wind when he was most recently reassigned to an operating unit. Before his vice chairman post he was APC's executive vice president and chief operating officer. He has been a member of the board since 1983.

According to the company's proxy statement, Mr. Hayashi earned $330,600 in 1989, had options on 2,500 shares at $35 each and owns 64,761 shares of company stock.

Michael Diaz, 41, the newly named executive vice president and chief operating officer of APD, is a native New Yorker and a graduate of Dartmouth

College. In his new post, he will answer to Mr. Rhein.

Mr. Diaz is from a family with three generations of maritime people. His father is the former chairman of the North Atlantic conference, and his grandfather was a ship broker.

Mr. Diaz also reportedly did very well testifying for APL as part of its bid to enter the Hawaii trade. Mr. Diaz was most recently president of American President Intermodal Co., which owns and controls APC's double-stack railcars. It also markets double-stack service to shippers' agents, freight brokers, shipping lines and motor carriers.

Before he was named to API in March 1989, Mr. Diaz was senior vice president of marketing and logistics with APL. He also served as North American vice president, special services vice president and managing director for Taiwan.

Mr. Diaz first joined American President Cos. in 1978 after eight years of operating and management experience with Sea-Land Service Inc.

John G. Burgess, 45, was just named executive vice president and chief operating officer of APL. Most recently, he served as APL's senior vice president of North America and before that was North American vice president. Mr. Burgess first joined the company in 1985 as vice president of land operations with APL.