Jacksonville Port Authority

Jacksonville Port Authority

Executive director

www.jaxport.com

Clearly, the most significant challenge in the maritime industry that we all face now and into the future is successfully ensuring our competitive operational throughput levels while complying with the new security requirements directed by the IMO International Ship & Port Security Code and by the Maritime Transportation Security Act, which were adopted in 2002. The terrorist acts of Sept. 11 profoundly changed our lives. Our collective effort to detect, deter and defend against another catastrophic attack cannot be overstated. Unfortunately, the global supply chain driven by free trade and supported almost exclusively by the maritime industry provides one of the greatest vulnerabilities that future terrorists could possibly exploit. As a result, all nodes of the supply chain have an inherent responsibility to integrate prudent security measures into their operational environment to enhance the protection of all.

The maritime industry has no choice but to aggressively implement the exhaustive and costly security requirements dictated by statutory and regulatory requirements. Seaports in particular face great challenges in successfully integrating these new security requirements with minimal impact on the accustomed speed of cargo throughput and operational efficiency. However, the new international and national security requirements do provide a common ground and level playing field for all ports, in that all are expected to meet the same minimum requirements and therefore face the same dilemma in retaining high productivity while meeting security requirements. Arguably, one of the greatest singular challenges facing all ports is the balance between access control requirements and timely throughput of cargo by truck and rail.