EC MONETARY UNION FORECAST IN 2 YEARS WITH SINGLE GERMANY

EC MONETARY UNION FORECAST IN 2 YEARS WITH SINGLE GERMANY

The European Community's 12 member nations will agree within the next two years to both a monetary union and much closer foreign policy coordination, a senior EC official predicted Monday.

The official, who asked not to be identified, also was optimistic that by 1992, East Germany, merged into West Germany, would become part of the EC.EC's moves toward closer monetary and political ties among its member nations, he said, stem at least partly from a general desire to ensure that a reunified Germany is deeply integrated into Western Europe's political and economic systems.

The EC already has set a 1992 target to clear away almost all barriers among its members to the free flow of capital, merchandise and persons.

Not only will this goal be met, the EC official said, but the EC countries by 1991 probably will agree to a timetable for monetary union, including both a common central bank and currency.

The call for monetary union is being led by West Germany, France and the EC's executive commission.

Closer coordination of foreign policies by the EC countries will prove of ''core importance" to the United States, the EC official predicted.

Such coordination, he said, also should facilitate greater foreign policy cooperation between the EC and the United States. Economic and foreign policies in the EC will become more "cohesive," he added.

Although Britain, a major EC member, so far has taken a cautious attitude toward the proposed monetary union, foreign policy coordination and East Germany's possible entry into the community, it soon may become more receptive to those ideas, the EC official suggested.

Increasingly, he said, British public opinion is becoming more favorable to these proposals. He doubted that U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher would go so far as to try to block their implementation.

EC member nations could proceed toward a monetary union and greater foreign policy coordination without Britain's assent, EC officials noted.

A meeting of EC leaders in late April may provide "a signal" as to how far and fast they want to move toward these goals, the senior official said.

Meanwhile, he added, the EC will consider special agreements with such East European countries as Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland to expand mutual trade.