C.R. SMITH, EDWARD CARLSON, AIR INDUSTRY TITANS, DIE

C.R. SMITH, EDWARD CARLSON, AIR INDUSTRY TITANS, DIE

The airline industry lost two titans this week.

C.R. Smith, who helped build American Airlines into one of the world's largest airlines and was secretary of commerce under President Lyndon B. Johnson, died Wednesday at a Washington, D.C., area hospital following a long illness. He was 90. Funeral arrangements are pending.Separately, a memorial service will be held Saturday at St. Mark's Cathedral in Seattle to honor Edward Carlson. Mr. Carlson, who worked his way

from bellhop to the chairman of UAL Inc., parent of United Airlines, died Tuesday of cancer at age 78 in Seattle.

Mr. Smith became president of American in 1934 and held the top post for more than three decades, stepping down only briefly for military service in World War II. Under his guidance, the airline went from a small, unprofitable carrier into a giant international corporation.

He resigned from American in 1968 to accept the cabinet post offered by Mr. Johnson.

After serving as secretary of commerce during the last year of the Johnson administration, Mr. Smith became a partner in an international banking firm and co-owner of a Montana ranch.

He later served as interim chairman and chief executive officer from September 1973 to February 1974.

Mr. Smith held various jobs before entering aviation in 1928. He went to work for Texas Air Transport Inc. as treasurer of the air mail carrier. He became vice president of the company, which later was merged into a predecessor of American Airlines.

Mr. Carlson joined UAL in August 1970, when United Airlines merged with Western International Hotels, now Westin Hotels. Mr. Carlson had headed the hotel chain since 1960.

He retired as UAL's chief executive officer in 1979 and as chairman in 1982. He retired completely in 1983, after a year as chairman of UAL's executive committee.