COMMODITY / ENERGY BRIEFS

COMMODITY / ENERGY BRIEFS

US SURGICAL ACQUIRES

RIGHT TO MARKET ORGANS

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - U.S. Surgical Corp. of Norwalk was granted exclusive rights from Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc. to market genetically engineered animal organs, especially pig parts, to benefit humans.

In exchange, U.S. Surgical has bought a 9.5 percent stake in Alexion, will help pay for subsequent research and development and give Alexion royalties on product sales.

"We are excited to work with Alexion to develop organs that potentially can eliminate the waiting lists of tens of thousands of patients who desperately need organ transplants," said Leon C. Hirsch, U.S. Surgical chairman.

Alexion, of New Haven, has developed a method of genetically engineering pigs so their organs are resistant to rejection in human transplants, said Leonard Bell, president and chief executive officer of Alexion.

AUSTRALIA SEES EASING

OF US WHEAT SUBSIDY

CANBERRA, Australia - Australian Trade Minister Sen. Bob McMullan said the ''continuing damage" sustained by domestic farmers affected by U.S. wheat export subsidies may be easing.

Mr. McMullan said the U.S. decision not to extend export subsidies to a recent shipment of 200,000 metric tons of wheat headed for Egypt may signal a U.S. intention to cut subsidies on a broader level.

"The U.S. is at last being consistent in allowing the principle of the market, rather than government intervention, to dictate world prices," he said in a joint statement with Minister for Primary Industry, Sen. Bob Collins.

"Wheat prices are at their highest level for years and the U.S. decision reflects a belated recognition of market realities."

HIGHER FUEL EFFICIENCY

TOO COSTLY, STUDY SAYS

WASHINGTON - Raising car fuel efficiency standards is an expensive way to

cut U.S. fuel consumption and could increase pollution, according to a study done for iron and steel manufacturers.

The study estimated raising corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards would cost the economy $3.8 billion to $9.9 billion a year by 2005, depending on how high the standards were.

Cars now must meet a 27.5-mile-a-gallon average, while trucks have to meet a 20.5-mile-a-gallon average, which the Transportation Department has proposed increasing.

The study by Charles River Associates found that if automakers improved technology to increase fuel efficiency, they would hike car prices, which would discourage people from buying new cars.