COMMODITY / CHEMICAL BRIEFS

COMMODITY / CHEMICAL BRIEFS

EXPERTS MAKE PROGRESS

ON TOXIC WASTE ISSUES

GENEVA - Experts from 51 nations, working since 1989 on a global framework to deal with toxic waste exports and disposal, have reached tentative agreement on some of the issues, U.N. officials said Tuesday.

Negotiators, who met last week under United Nations auspices, reached tentative agreement on a definition of damage in the event of an accident resulting from the export or disposal of toxic waste.

But waste-exporting industrial nations and developing countries remained divided on issues such as state liability, officials at the U.N. Environment Program said.

Negotiators are drafting a protocol to a 1989 convention that stipulates that exports of toxic waste must be handled in an "environmentally sound manner." They will reconvene again in Geneva in January.

S. AFRICA TO RESUME

TRADE OF KRUGERRAND

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Africa's gold producers are to resume active international promotion of Krugerrand gold coins next month following an 8-year absence from the market.

Sanctions and trade embargoes against South Africa since 1985 ended the export and promotion of the coins, which until then had accounted for sales of 45.7 million ounces of gold in the form of 53.7 million coins in four denominations.

"'In spite of South Africa's isolation from these markets, the coin's well-established attributes of international recognition and world-wide

tradeability, as well as its reputation for storing and preserving wealth, persisted,"' said Dan Pollnow, senior general manager of the Chamber of Mines in its latest newsletter.

The marketing and advertising campaign will be launched in Germany under the theme "'Krugerrand - World Money."

WHEAT OFFICIALS EXPECT

FURTHER PRICE DECLINES

ABERDEEN, S.D. - Wheat prices probably won't go up much even though the federal government has relaxed limits on vomitoxin, an industry spokesman said.

"It looks likes the price trend is probably down, even from what it is now," said Keith Hainy, director of grain operations for the South Dakota Wheat Growers in Aberdeen.

The Food and Drug Administration last week eliminated its guidelines for amounts of vomitoxin in whole grains, although guidelines for finished products will remain the same.

Some South Dakota wheat farmers are finding varying amounts of vomitoxin in their grain harvest this year. Cool and wet conditions have produced scab, a disease that frequently carries vomitoxin.