BRIEFS

BRIEFS

PLANES

BA, AA MOVE CLOSER

TO SECURING ALLIANCE

WASHINGTON - British Airways and American Airlines moved one step closer to getting their coveted alliance Monday when the U.S. government set a timetable for its review.

The U.S. Department of Transpor- tation requested comments on the alliance by May 11, and responses to those comments by June 10, one day before the airlines' two year anniversary of requesting the alliance.

Before the partnership is approved however, the United States and Britain must sign an ''open-skies'' treaty. The free-market pact will allow any airline to fly as often as it likes between the United States and Britain, theoretically setting up the necessary competitive atmosphere to keep the alliance from exerting too much control on the market.

No schedule has been set for resuming those talks.

$275 MILLION MAY BE

RECOUPED FOR AIR PROGRAM

WASHINGTON - Airport advocates may have a chance to recoup $275 million dollars that opponents threatened to cut from the Airport Improvements Program.

Rep. Todd Tiahrt, R-Kan,, a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, successfully got an amendment to restore the money added to the House supplemental appropriations bill scheduled to come to the floor Tuesday. The money would be automatically restored if the bill passes.

The 1998 AIP funding was cut last week by the House Appropriations Committee.

TRUCKS

EU OFFICIAL: 1 MEMBER

HALTING ALPS TRUCK PACT

AMSTERDAM - European Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock said Tuesday one member country was holding up an EU pact on truck transport through the Alps, but the nation was expected to back down.

Mr. Kinnock declined to name the country, but EU diplomats have said Germany is responsible for blocking a pact over fees for trucks in Switzerland.

The EU and Switzerland hammered out an agreement in January on a schedule of transit fees, which Swiss officials say will help protect the fragile Alpine environment. But earlier this month Mr. Kinnock failed to win unanimous backing from member state transport ministers for the deal.

COURT RULES US SHOULD

PAY FOR TEAMSTERS VOTE

NEW YORK - A federal appeals court says the government should pay for the rerun of a 1996 Teamsters election because it agreed nearly a decade ago to pay for monitoring so it could keep out mob influence.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a split decision Monday overturned a lower court judge who had ordered the International Brotherhood of Teamsters to pay. No date has been set for the election. The ruling cited the terms of a consent decree between the Teamsters and the government. It called for the Teamsters to pay for federal supervision of an election in 1991 and for the government to pay if it chose to continue it for the 1996 election that spawned the runoff.

The government spent more than $17.5 million on the Teamsters' 1996 election, which was won by Ron Carey. He was barred from running for re-election after a court-appointed election officer said he had helped embezzle union funds. He has denied wrongdoing.