BRAZIL EXPRESSES HOPES OF JOINING TIN PRODUCING ASSOCIATION THIS YEAR

BRAZIL EXPRESSES HOPES OF JOINING TIN PRODUCING ASSOCIATION THIS YEAR

Brazil hopes to join the Association of Tin Producing Countries this year, but membership still depends on success of efforts to end contraband activities in the Amazon, senior government officials said.

Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Mello "has told us he wants Brazil in the Association of Tin Producing Countries this year, but only if we can finally end tin-concentrate contraband," said Elmer Prata Salomao, director of the National Minerals Research Department.The department is responsible for all areas of government minerals policy. Brazil currently holds observer status at the tin association.

The association repeatedly has invited Brazil to become a full member ever since the 1987 discovery of the huge Bom Futuro tin mine.

The mine, in the southwest Amazon, catapulted Brazil to the rank of No. 1 world tin producer.

Brazil, however, has declined full membership to the ATPC, citing a need to control contraband tin production and exports at Bom Futuro.

"Brazil has worked, and will continue to work very closely with the ATPC toward an orderly market," Mr. Salomao said.

"We know that world tin concentrate stocks are high, at least partly

because of Brazilian contraband, and we do not wish to be full members until the contraband problem has been cleared up."

Mr. Salomao said, however, that at the last ATPC meeting in October 1991, in Canberra, Australia, Brazil agreed to a self-imposed calendar 1992 export quota of 28,000 metric tons of tin concentrate.

Brazil also agreed to tin council quotas for 1990 and 1991, but actually exported less than the quota both years.

The 1991 quota was 30,600 metric tons, but Brazil exported only 22,000.