William B. Cassidy

William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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The need for speed and distribution points closer to customers is fueling growth and demand for more capacity among LTL carriers, even in a softer overall freight market.

More from William B. Cassidy

When it comes to profitability, FedEx’s less-than-truckload arm outperformed its bigger, package-focused sister divisions, while gaining e-commerce business.
The acquisition of two Van Soest Coldstores facilities complements Lineage’s existing network of refrigerated sites across Belgium, the Netherlands, and the UK.
The second-largest US less-than-truckload company will add or expand eight terminals in the second half of 2019 as the LTL sector takes a long-haul view of the economy.
Chicago-based Forager last week became the latest logistics technology startup to take aim at the increasingly complex US cross-border trucking market.
An agreement between two of the oldest US regional LTL carriers is designed to speed cross-country LTL shipments, and reduce costs for trucking operators and shippers.
Multiregional LTL carrier Saia adds three new terminals in the Northeast and expands in Philadelphia amid a market giving off mixed signals.
Technology smoothing logistics sourcing shifts
Older logistics outsourcing models are being replaced by collaboration among multiple partners on specific, high-priority projects as technology advances.
Winning more favorable terms from its lenders will help YRC Worldwide proceed with a strategic plan to reshape its LTL networks and improve profitability.
The definition of visibility is stretching beyond container or truck tracking to bundle more supply chain activities.
“We don’t think about our supply chain as a collection of technologies, but as processes,” Abir Thakurta, vice president of global supply chain for the Atlanta-based furniture retailer, said in a...