William B. Cassidy

William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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The pandemic adds impetus to the rush to develop more sophisticated tools that can give shippers better insight into future truck rates, and eventually “forward-looking visibility.”

More from William B. Cassidy

BCOs and drayage truckers need to document unreasonable detention and demurrage charges, but also not contribute to the problem, speakers toldl a JOC.com webcast.
US trucking companies are preparing to brake hard once the current surge of essential freight fades. The loss of demand and capacity will complicate the eventual recovery.
Demand for essential goods and medical supplies is drawing truck capacity even as business shutdowns dry up other sources of freight, a trend that could result in displaced capacity.
Truck drivers can both drive and work beyond regulatory limits if they’re hauling essential goods during the COVID-19 pandemic, and shippers need to do whatever they can to make that easier.
The truck plant shutdowns follow a wave of broader automotive factory shutdowns the previous week, led by the big three automakers, Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler, who were followed by Honda...
Spot truck rates are up about 5 percent since the end of February on demand for consumer staples, even as the US economy slows. Pricing may still be elevated when Chinese imports hit US ports and...
The 10-year US economic expansion is over, killed by the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019), and the recovery will be slow, IHS Markit chief economist Nariman Behravesh warns.
The response to the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is dominating business at FedEx, as global air and domestic ground supply needs swing and the firm looks to prioritize test kits...
FedEx expands use of its US ground unit to deliver more air express packages, as e-commerce volumes swell and Amazon ups the competitive ante.
Truck capacity is being tightened in drive-thru-sized bites as restaurant and rest stop closings delay drivers.