Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor, JOC.com Mark Szakonyi, based in Washington, D.C., covers railroads, U.S. transportation and trade policy, sourcing and ocean shipping.

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Port of Oakland.
"I’m not optimistic we are going to see a grand bargain with all the tariffs coming off,” Lance Noble, senior analyst at Gavekal Dragonomics, said at the TPM Asia Conference on Oct. 10.

More from Mark Szakonyi

On the surface, China’s Asia-Europe rail subsidies seem like a slam-dunk win for shippers, a free lunch. But as the axiom states, “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” And that axiom applies to...
A freight train travels across China.
China’s government has invested billions in the China-Europe rail network, and volume, propelled by subsidies, has surged. However, those subsidies have created other downsides for shippers and the...
A container ship during refueling.
The unveiling of new bunker fuel adjustment factors from three of the largest global container lines over the last week has focused the industry’s attention to billions of dollars of extra cost...
A container ship at sea.
The new bunker fuel adjustment factors will provide more insight concerning whether ocean carriers can recoup what they argue are increased operational costs for bunker fuel and for meeting the Jan....
Necessity is leading to creative and effective solutions in US surface transportation.
Appalachian Regional Port.
An axiom argues, “Necessity is the mother of invention,” and there’s no better example of that than what tight North American truck capacity has prompted.
This is the price the industry pays for its inability to reach a level of stability where container lines can make enough money from rates to cover their operating costs, much less turn a profit
Port of Los Angeles.
Higher-than-usual fuel prices and tit-for-tat tariffs have exacerbated the chaos on the eastbound trans-Pacific this peak season, but the problem started earlier this year, and there is one causal...
Beyond the headlines, the tariffs are making structural changes to the US economy that will impact consumer and export demand for the coming years.
Home construction in Texas, United States.
Backers of tariffs always promise positive results for the domestic economy. But tariffs were tried by the United States and many other nations in the early stages of the Great Depression in the...