Janet Nodar

Janet Nodar

Janet Nodar is Senior Editor for Project and Heavy-Lift at the JOC, covering breakbulk, project and heavy-lift transport. She is based on the U.S. Gulf coast. She was a reporter and editor for the Journal of Commerce's Gulf Shipper and Breakbulk publications from 2006-2013. From 2013-2018 she was Content Director with Breakbulk Events & Media. She holds degrees in finance and English.

The latest vessels in UHL’s F-900 series will be built in Hudong, China, and are due to be delivered in late 2023 and early 2024.

More from Janet Nodar

As the global energy transition gains momentum, a “mismatched” market will become more complex, partitioned, and costly, according to Jim Burkhard, head of oil market research at S&P Global.
A tightening supply of multipurpose ships bodes well for carriers and their bottom lines, but signals a higher "new normal" ahead for breakbulk and project shippers.
The latest newbuild order from Japan’s MOL continues a flurry of vehicle carrier orders made in the last month that will result in a bigger — and greener fleet — global fleet.
Breakbulk importers must navigate complex sanctions rules and a CBP crackdown on goods made with forced labor, attendees at JOC’s 2022 Breakbulk and Project Cargo conference were told.
Severely limited warehousing capacity at North American ports is adding to the challenges facing breakbulk shippers in 2022, attendees at JOC’s Breakbulk and Project Cargo conference were told.
Although rates could plateau or slide as global stressors impact the MPV market, underlying demand will not soften as the energy transition accelerates.
Maersk Supply Service has ordered a new wind turbine installation vessel to build offshore wind projects on the US Atlantic seaboard.
Burned by losses, key engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) firms continue to shift away from lump-sum contracting and toward more risk-averse strategies in the oil and gas space.
Combi Lift will serve as a wholesale "integrator" of owner Harren & Partner’s assets, including the carriers SAL Heavy Lift and Intermarine
The Georgia Ports Authority plans to spend $150 million to create a “massive gateway port” for ro/ro and breakbulk cargo.