Top 50 Trucking Companies

The largest of the large US trucking companies toiled uphill last year through the second economic slump since the end of the recession eight years ago, adding revenue and raising the combined top line of The Journal of Commerce’s Top 50 US Trucking Companies.

Only half the truckload, less-than-truckload (LTL), and specialized carriers on the list increased sales in 2016, however, as lower rates, lower fuel surcharges, and especially lower demand in a depressed retail and industrial freight market drew down revenue for the other half.

This may be the year companies in the Top 50 rankings, prepared for JOC.com by SJ Consulting Group, return to the type of growth they enjoyed in 2014, or at least something closer to it, as the US economy is expected to expand faster and more steadily this year.

 

Key Top Trucking ranking stories:

 
 

Top 50 2016 Rankings 

Top 50 2015 Rankings

Top 25 LTL 2015: Revenue up 9.1 percent for 25 largest LTL carriers

Top 50 2014: Top 50 trucking companies rode their brakes in 2013

Top 50 2013: A first: Top 50 trucking revenue exceeds $100 billion

Top 50 2014 Rankings

Top 50 2013 Rankings

Special Coverage

An XPO logistics truck.
Higher demand and pricing has shifted the Top 50 US trucking operators to the fast lane, and more growth is ahead.

News & Analysis

A truck travels in the United States.
16 Oct 2018
After a year of double-digit increases, spot rate gains are slowing, and truck rates and revenue increases are expected to ‘moderate’ to the mid-single-digit range in 2019.
Trucks travel on a US highway.
15 Oct 2018
US trucking has entered a new era, in which a ‘new normal’ has been established. Even so, for shippers, there are some encouraging sector developments concerning driver recruitment and overall truck capacity.
A truck being loaded in the United States.
12 Oct 2018
There is no debate: US truck capacity is tight. Still, this supply and demand imbalance offers an opportunity for shippers to assess their shipping practices. They will find their inefficiencies are responsible for more cost in absolute dollars than the increase in expenditure that results from higher rates.
A truck travels in Florida, United States.
11 Oct 2018
Shippers can and should stop using paper bills of lading (B/Ls). If truck drivers can live without paper logbooks, shippers can scrap paper B/Ls. Savings for carriers and shippers will result.
A UPS truck being loaded in California, United States.
09 Oct 2018
During the past several years, the less-than-truckload industry and the analyst community have made a big deal of the need to convert to dimensional pricing instead of the classification system of the regulated era that ended in 1980.
A truck travels in South Dakota, United States.
08 Oct 2018
For those who think that it’s somehow counterintuitive to have a pricing model designed to create a loss or to reduce operating margins, rest assured, it is.

Commentary

What will the US trucking capacity situation be in five years? Will it be tighter than today, looser, or about the same? A show of hands to those questions at a panel — which I moderated at the Council of Supply Chain Management Professional’s 2018 Edge Conference — revealed most expect further tightness come 2023. Fundamentally, yours truly does not fully agree. 

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