Annual Review and Outlook - Trucking

Annual Review and Outlook - Trucking

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Gaining visibility into truckload movements allows shippers to improve transportation execution and efficiency, as well as accurately benchmark carrier performance and enforce minimum service standards for providers.
Chronic cross-border trucking delays serve as a reminder of how fragile the freight connection between the United States and its largest trading partner continues to be.
Less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers maintained pricing discipline and focusing on their bottom lines in 2019, but the overall outlook for the sector in 2020 still depends largely on a flagging US manufacturing industry.
The US truckload freight market took some bruising in 2019, but there are signs that a rebound may be around the corner in 2020.
With the number of truck drivers in the United States expected to continue rising steadily, motor carriers in the coming years will be focused on to getting the most out of existing drivers' miles and ensuring drivers earn enough money to keep them behind the wheel.
New legislation will take effect in California Jan. 1 that would make it much more difficult for truck drivers to retain independent contractor status, but owner operators are stuck in limbo pending a court decision on a legal challenge to the new rules.

ARO Commentaries

The reality of hundreds of thousands of marine chassis scattered throughout the major ports and inland intermodal hubs — with different operating rules, different operational models, and competing interests in each location — contributes to the significant complexity in the North American intermodal container paradigm.
Shippers can prepare for the unknown by working to become shippers of choice.
Legislation in California and in New Jersey regarding the status of independent contractors is not a good idea and will add unnecessary costs that ultimately will be passed on to consumers.
Shippers will continue to value consistency, making contracted freight a winner in 2020.
Predictive load-matching, trend analysis, and maximized backhaul utilization will help drive the 2020 market into a more balanced price structure for all stakeholders.
Motor carriers must work closely with shippers to overcome increased costs in the form of higher driver wages and benefits, insurance premiums, and tolls.
After 2018's hot freight market gave way to record lows in 2019, shippers and providers have learned the value of a long-term market view for sustainable success.
Developing and investing in a platform that allows customers to see the location of their shipments, when they will arrive, and when to expect potential delays will be critical to meeting customer expectations in the next decade.