Commentary

Commentary

As the growth in the number of exports from Mexico to the U.S. shows no signs of slowing down, the challenges that come as a result of the trade imbalance will not go away. This cycle is not healthy for the transportation industry, and we need to find ways to encourage capacity into the market.
The protectionist tide that was spreading earlier this year is only growing under the weight of geopolitical conflict and a morass of bureaucratic red tape, threatening to derail a U.S. export recovery.
Canals used to be a sleepy topic. Suddenly, times have changed.
Truck-mounted cameras, especially those that capture video of the truck driver during an incident, may be a hard sell to some truckers, but as they realize the amount of control they have over the system — and see benefits — drivers will come around, according to Adam Kahn, senior director of marketing for SmartDrive.
John McLaurin, president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association, encourages those in transportation and trade to spare some time to think of the seafarers and the important work they do.
As a lead logistics provider managing forwarders and transactional shipments, we question if it matters who is listed as a consignee on a waybill, and who is listed as the notify party.
As of today, July 30, there is no U.S. West Coast longshore agreement in place, a month after the previous six-year pact expired. In any contract year, the time between expiration and agreement is especially volatile, because the risk of cargo-disrupting labor actions is at its highest. And the risk of disruption isn't diminishing.
In five years as Federal Motor Carrier Safety administrator, Anne S. Ferro has changed trucking.
Two economists at Northwestern University debate whether all of the great ideas have already been invented, this after a June dedication of a statue of inventor Charles F. Kettering in Loudonville, Ohio. Well, people are still intelligent and imaginative, and there are valuable things left to create.
Shippers are breathing a sigh of relief because there haven’t been any major disruptions at U.S. West Coast ports, nearly a month after a brief extension of the contract between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and employers represented by the Pacific Maritime Association expired. Both sides seem to understand that a shutdown of any kind wouldn’t be in their best interest.
An ocean forwarder will soon handle overseas shipments and questions liability impact of the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act and the Carmack Amendment regarding imports and exports.
Pressures on supply chain and warehouse operations have grown more critical as e-commerce market dynamics have evolved, led by Amazon and Wal-Mart.
I’ve been arguing since early this year that international transportation is headed for trouble because of a variety of transportation-specific problems exacerbated by an improving economy that’s driving faster volume growth and pushing capacity to the limit. With half the year over and the peak shipping season about to begin, those concerns are only deepening.
Managed services can be an effective alternative to internal staffing under the right conditions, with two of the most critical being the ability of the managed services provider to meet the customer’s service needs at a price point that would preferably be lower than it would cost to hire a person.