William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

E-mail Bill.
Follow Bill on Twitter.
Bill's profile on Google+.

Despite an uptick in volume in July, trucking executives see a long road ahead before truckload rates rise.

More from William B. Cassidy

Truckload revenue per load was down 15 percent in the second quarter at Echo Global Logistics, but mergers and acquisitions kept the company in the black overall.
The acquisition of Command Transportation last year is helping Echo Global Logistics gain truckload brokerage market share.
The slight year-over-year drop in quarterly revenue was the first for ODFL since 2009.
Looking beyond the broader market, Hub Group sees share gain, more volume ahead.
Broker benefits from lower costs, but lower rates take a bite out of truckload revenue.
US trucking industry pioneer built one of the largest LTL carriers, now UPS Freight.
TransForce's package division increased sales 6 percent, but its trucking business struggled in the second quarter.
Like competitor Swift Transportation, Werner is reducing its fleet capacity.
The fifth-largest U.S. truckload carrier is cutting some shippers loose as they seek deep rate cuts in a soft market.
Swift Transportation's efforts to control capacity weren't enough to stave off a decline in earnings.
Span Alaska gives Matson Logistics greater reach into The Frontier State, and door-to-door service capabilities increasingly needed to compete.
A drop in spot rates and sluggish economy bit into revenue and profit at the fourth-largest U.S. truckload carrier.