William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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Saia has expansion on the mind despite a fall in LTL shipment volume in the third quarter.
Cranking up profits and gaining freight, the multiregional less-than-truckload carrier looks to fill one of the last large gaps in its coverage.

More from William B. Cassidy

Plunging truckload rates proved a dead weight on profits at C.H. Robinson Worldwide in the third quarter.
The largest US truckload carrier cut more than 1,600 tractors from its overal fleet in the past year, but added 130 trucks to its dedicated business, which increased revenue and profit.
Old Dominion Freight Lines avoided damage and used technology and phones to keep close contact with customers as storm and flooding pummeled its home state.
Even when volumes rise, lower revenue shows impact of reduced rates and fuel surcharges at publicly owned carriers.
US regulators are increasing funding for driver-training schools and institutions serving veterans while pushing a pilot program that would license under-21 ex-military drivers.
US shippers may be concerned about trucking rate hikes in 2017 and 2018, but pricing power isn't likely to slip away from them soon.
A week after Hurricane Matthew’s clouds lifted, US shippers continue to experience delays or outright embargoes on cargo moving in and around eastern North Carolina where rail lines and roads remain...
Quarterly net profit dropped at the third-largest trucking operator for the first time since early 2014, thanks to lower truckload and intermodal rates. Dedicated is an exception.
The Teamsters' long-haul campaign to organize XPO Logistics, as well as FedEx Freight, unfolds terminal by terminal, court decision by court decision.
Falling revenue per tractor and higher equipment and insurance costs will narrow Covenant Transport's third-quarter profits, and the truckload carrier won't be alone.