Marsha Salisbury

Marsha is a veteran insider of the shipping industry with experience in sales and business development. Marsha is the data expert for all things shipping. She has the unique expertise of looking at how yesterday’s experience and today’s metric build the maritime industry of tomorrow.

E-mail Marsha
Follow Marsha on Twitter
Connect with Marsha on LinkedIn.

For more of Marsha's research, see Container Carrier Mergers & Acquisitions, 1977-Present.

China’s largest port is also the world’s largest, opening a 5.6 million-TEU gap over No. 2 Singapore in 2015.

More from Marsha Salisbury

Overall U.S. container trade with European countries increased in the 12 months ending Mar. 31, 2016.
U.S. exports continue to struggle amid low freight rates and the strong dollar. 
The following is a detailed history of mergers and acquisitions in the ocean container shipping industry from 1977 to the present.
Slide show: Growth among the leaders on the JOC's Top 100 Importers in 2015 rankings involved tenacity and perseverance in building scale with global agility.
U.S. container trade with Asian countries increased in the 12 months ending March 31, 2016, according to data from PIERS, a sister product of JOC.com within IHS.
For those companies ranked in the JOC’s Top 100 U.S. Importers in 2015, growth was driven by more than mergers and acquisitions. 
Investment, divestment, mergers and acquisitions mark growth strategy of seven of the JOC's Top 100 Exporters in 2015.
U.S. Gulf Coast ports handled 8.2 percent or 2.6 million twenty-foot-equivalent units of the total 31.9 million laden TEUs in the U.S. container trade in 2015.
The major takeaway from the companies ranked in the JOC’s Top 100 Exporters in 2015 in the U.S. container trade was the impact of synergies of scale in mergers and acquisitions.
For the second consecutive year, no U.S. West Coast port achieved double-digit growth or even made the Top 10 fastest-growing ports among the JOC Top 25 North American container ports in 2015.