Bill Mongelluzzo

Bill Mongelluzzo is senior editor with The Journal of Commerce, based in Long Beach, Calif.

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The challenges of the Hanjin Shipping collapse are often unique to the position of actors in the supply chain.
Trucking companies that regularly hauled containers for Hanjin Shipping may end up losing tens of thousands of dollars.

More from Bill Mongelluzzo

An agreement to extend contracts early from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and International Longshoremen’s Association would usher in an unprecedented era of labor peace at US ports.
The International Longshore and Warehouse Union and Pacific Maritime Association on Tuesday raised shippers’ hopes for a longer period of labor peace at US West Coast ports.
SeaLand announced Monday it has added the Port of Hueneme, California, to its weekly west coast Central America service.
Trans-Pacific spot rates remained stuck in a narrow range this week even though the trade was roiled by the Hanjin Shipping bankruptcy and vessels are approaching full utilization.
A stronger export season is taking shape  in the westbound trans-Pacific.
Although the Hanjin Shipping crisis has challenged the global supply chain, it also provides lessons for shippers unique to national and regional industry dynamics.
Hanjin Shipping’s bankruptcy filing has once again exposed how fragile the new chassis regime is in the United States.
Growth in trans-Pacific volumes has been fairly static this year for non-vessel-operating common carriers, but consolidation, new alliances, and Hanjin’s collapse present new opportunities.
Extended gate hours at the Port of Oakland, pictured, are pulling down costs for shippers and driving up productivity.
Beneficial cargo owners and truckers in Northern California support extended gate hours at Oakland's largest terminal.
The larger locks of the Panama Canal, pictured, have made it possible to reroute large amounts of cargo destined for the interior United States away from West Coast ports.
Irrational exuberance could result in inflated expectations and overbuilding of transportation infrastructure to the US interior if the cargo volumes don’t materialize.
“Cost, consistency and capacity will determine the gateways through which Asian imports enter the US."
Spot freight rates in the eastbound Pacific may have found their comfort zone.