West Coast Labor Disputes

Relations between members of the International Longshoremen and Warehouse Union and waterfront employers on the U.S. West Coast have heated up over the past couple years, with protests and other actions in the Pacific Northwest and at ports in California.

The two parties are currently in negotiations for a new contract to replace the one slated to expire on June 30, 2014. For our continuing coverage of the negotiations, visit our ILWU Labor Negotiations page.

News & Analysis

Ships at berth at the Port of Long Beach, such as the one pictured, are able to plug into shore-supplied power, which is known as cold-ironing, as part of the port's pollution reduction efforts.
25 Aug 2016
The congestion that crippled West Coast ports in 2015 temporarily derailed the progress in reducing pollution at the Port of Long Beach.
White House
19 Nov 2014
Amid pleas of major shippers for a federal mediator, President Obama says he's confident U.S. West Coast longshoremen and waterfront employers can reach a labor contract.
18 Nov 2014
U.S agriculture shippers yesterday urged President Obama to “intervene personally” by bringing in a federal mediators to help reach a U.S. West Coast labor contract deal and end slowdowns at West Coast ports.
West Coast
15 Nov 2014
JOC.com readers continued to devour news emerging from the U.S. West Coast this past week, but one story on Horizon Lines being dissolved slipped into the Top 10.
holiday shopping
14 Nov 2014
Retailers are on the losing end of U.S. port congestion, forced to make costly, last minute transportation decisions because of clogged U.S. West Coast ports cargo delays.
14 Nov 2014
Evergreen is dropping Los Angeles and Oakland port calls from a westbound U.S. East Coast to North Asia service due to berthing delays tied to the congestion at U.S. West Coast ports, the carrier said Friday.

Commentary

Contract extension talks between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association must address productivity issues in a serious way so US West Coast ports get somewhere remotely close to the efficiency at other major ports in the world. 

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