Port Productivity


About the JOC Port Productivity Rankings

Within any prevailing trend, there will always be winners and losers. By ranking ports and terminals in terms of berth productivity, the JOC aims to shine a light on efficiency, and perhaps be a catalyst to improving it.

In the past, we’ve published straight productivity rankings — that is, the top ports and terminals by region and broken down by vessel size. Those rankings did not consider call size — the number of containers moving by ship per call — and thus, in a sense, did not give a complete picture of productivity. Nor did they reasonably allow for ports or terminals outside the top 10 in port productivity to make the rankings, resulting in an overly predictable list year after year. 

So this year, we analyzed which terminals made the greatest strides in port efficiency from 2014 to 2015. It is, by definition, difficult for a high-performing terminal to make these lists, so for those accustomed to appearing at the top, understand that your performance is no less worthy.

For this year’s rankings, we’ve also broken the world down into nine regions, separating Africa and Europe, and Latin America and North America, which previously had been grouped together.  

Starting with berth productivity — the average number of container moves per crane, per hour while a ship is at berth — we’ve measured relative improvement. We then weighted those productivity numbers by call size to achieve actual improvement in year-over-year performance, the measurement by which the rankings have been listed. 

To qualify, a terminal must have improved actual and relative (unweighted) productivity, and processed more than 100 ship calls in 2015 and a minimum of 50 in 2014. 

For more information on purchasing the underlying data or to  learn more about our Port Productivity Subscription Report, which provides in-depth industry market analysis, visit  www.joc.com/port_productivity.

 

News & Analysis

Two different parts of the federal government, the Commerce Department and Department of Transportation, are looking into the issue of productivity at U.S. ports.
24 Aug 2016
The U.S. federal government, with the help of shippers and others, is trying to come to grips with how to improve port productivity.
16 Aug 2016
Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust shippers are claiming that container line charges are eroding the benefits of direct port delivery services.
Officials hope that automated customs clearance will help relieve congestion at the port of Yangon fueled by infrastructure limitations and growing container volumes.
16 Aug 2016
Customs changes could help relieve crippling congestion at the port of Yangon in Myanmar.
Drayage drivers serving the ports of Seattle and Tacoma will have a bit more time and flexibility to complete moves this peak season.
15 Aug 2016
Beneficial cargo owners are lauding a peak-season program of flex and late gates.
Port automation is a contentious issue in labor-management relations at ports around the globe, including the Port of Auckland, pictured.
15 Aug 2016
Ports of Auckland want to avoid bad blood that spurred industrial actions at Australian ports.
The Port of Mumbai, pictured, is hoping to replicate the results of direct import delivery at Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust, which drastically cut container dwell times.
12 Aug 2016
Port of Mumbai this week issued a trade advisory calling on shippers to use direct port delivery services for the clearance of their import cargo.

Commentary

Productivity data, when done right, can improve cargo visibility, availability and velocity.

More Commentary

Video

Clearmetal Founder and Chief Executive Officer Adam Compain got together with JOC Senior Content Editor Alessandra Barrett at the 16th TPM Conference to chat about the largest challenges facing ocean carriers when it comes to equipment positioning and repositioning and the hurdles created in this regard by the ever-growing complexity of supply chains.
JOC Senior Content Editor Alessandra Barrett joins APM Terminals Head of Pricing and Strategy Jeremy Ford at the 16th TPM Conference in Long Beach to discuss the rate of growth in ship sizes and APMT’s strategy for coping with these vessels and the operational challenges of vessel-sharing agreements. The duo also discuss APMT’s efforts to breed efficiency beyond the waterfront and throughout the rest of the supply chain.
At TPM 2016, Port of Prince Rupert's President and CEO Don Krusel joined JOC.com to discuss its 26 percent growth in 2016, plans for additional capacity, the role of collaboration and Fairview Terminal's unique design, as well as its drivers for growth.