ILWU Labor Negotiations

ILWU Labor Negotiations

All eyes are on the U.S. West Coast, where negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association continue despite the expiration of the parties’ current contract. Talks began on May 12 and cover a variety of hot-button issues. For full details, and more information on the tumultuous relationship between dockworkers and the PMA, consult our FAQ.

ILWU-PMA negotiations: 2008 vs. 2014

 

 

Special Coverage

Negotiations are underway for a new contract between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and employers represented by the Pacific Maritime Association. This JOC resource provides answers to common questions regarding the negotiations and their potential impact.

News & Analysis

22 Nov 2014
The CEOs of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma have urged President Obama to assign a federal monitor to help settle a West Coast longshoremen’s contract dispute that the port officials said is having a “crippling effect” on commerce.
21 Nov 2014
U.S. Federal Maritime Commission staff is looking into ocean carriers’ renewed plans to implement West Coast port congestion surcharges, FMC Chairman Mario Cordero said today.
21 Nov 2014
The inability of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association to achieve consensus in the contract negotiations that began more than six months ago was demonstrated once again today with parties disagreeing over the current status of the talks.
21 Nov 2014
Five carriers today joined Mediterranean Shipping Co. in announcing congestion surcharges on cargo heading from Asia to U.S. West Coast ports.
21 Nov 2014
U.S. retailers today expressed their disappointment that coastwide U.S. West Coast port labor talks won’t begin until early December and reiterated their call for President Obama to get involved.
Seattle port
20 Nov 2014
West Coast states would be hit hardest if their ports are shut by a longshore strike or lockout, but the most severe impact would be longer-term, according to maritime economist John C. Martin.

Commentary

As of today, July 30, there is no U.S. West Coast longshore agreement in place, a month after the previous six-year pact expired. In any contract year, the time between expiration and agreement is especially volatile, because the risk of cargo-disrupting labor actions is at its highest. And the risk of disruption isn't diminishing.

More Commentary