East Coast Ports

In-depth news, analysis and statistical information of U.S. East Coast ports such as the Port of New York and New Jersey and the Port of Savannah. Dockworkers on the U.S. East Coast are represented by the International Longshoremen's Association. East Coast ports have spent the last several years preparing for the opening of the new locks of the Panama Canal, which handled their first commercial transit on June 26, 2016. Industry observers are now watching closely to see if East Coast ports begin to capture a larger share of imports from Asia, which the West Coast has traditionally dominated.

Special Coverage

Both sides say they're still interested in an early deal, but talk of a 10-year contract has cooled.

News & Analysis

29 Nov 2016
The International Longshoremen’s Association and its employers have scheduled “informal meetings on collective bargaining issues.”
The APM Terminals facility in Elizabeth, New Jersey, will be able to handle ships with capacities of 13,000 twenty-foot-equivalent units upon completion of the new investments.
31 Aug 2016
APM Terminals is to invest millions in a new berth at its Port Elizabeth terminal in the Port of New York and New Jersey.
Two different parts of the federal government, the Commerce Department and Department of Transportation, are looking into the issue of productivity at U.S. ports.
24 Aug 2016
The U.S. federal government, with the help of shippers and others, is trying to come to grips with how to improve port productivity.
22 Aug 2016
Authorities at the Port of New York and New Jersey are scrutinizing trucks bought under a program that awards grants to replace older, polluting drayage vehicles.
A number of issues on both coasts stand in the way of early contract talks between dockworkers and employers that could usher in an unprecedented period of labor peace at U.S. ports.
10 Aug 2016
The International Longshoremen’s Association won't discuss a contract extension until disputes over the current contract are resolved.
The Port of Baltimore, pictured, has rail access, but would stand to gain much if that access could accommodate double-stacked trains.
21 Jul 2016
The Port of Baltimore is not giving up on a project to raise the Howard Street tunnel enough to allow the passage of double-stacked freight trains.

Commentary

The reaction of shippers to West Coast longshore labor disruption is evolving in such a way that West Coast ports have reason for concern.

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