Port News

Nineteen container ships were anchored outside the congested ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Saturday morning, according to the Marine Exchange of Southern California.

Financial impacts of port congestion on the U.S. West Coast are extending into odd corners of the American economy, including New Orleans’ annual carnival season that culminates Feb. 17 with Mardi Gras.

GCT Global Container Terminals plans to spend several hundred million dollars in the next few years to increase its Vancouver terminals’ capacity and fluidity in anticipation of handling more U.S.-bound cargo and Canadian volume.

Harbor truckers in Los Angeles-Long Beach are preparing to legally challenge the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and marine terminal operators as soon as union mechanics attempt to detain trucker-owned or leased chassis at the ports under a reported agreement the ILWU reached with employers last week in coastwide contract negotiations.

Rick Larrabee, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s top seaport executive for the last 15 years, said he plans to retire after his successor is selected.

The Port of Houston posted record container and steel volumes last year, with increases of 4.5 percent in loaded containers and 41.3 percent in steel shipments.

Stakeholders in the Port of Virginia huddled last week for the second time in three months to hash out new strategies to tackle congestion outside port terminals.

The Long Beach port of the future will be a “smart port,” as described the its new chief executive, that uses technology to link all supply chain participants in a unified effort to increase cargo velocity, and an “energy island” that is a self-sustaining generator of clean energies.

When it comes to whether Port Metro Vancouver will experience a crippling drayage strike like it did last March, the ball is in union and non-union drivers’ court.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — With transloading capacity scarce in Vancouver, an inland port 200 miles away aims to give forestry exporters the consistency in stuffing their products into containers they might not find in the greater Vancouver area.