The number of heavy truck drivers in the U.S. rose more quickly last year, breaking past 1.6 million for the first time since 2008, as higher pay and strong freight demand attracted recruits. Demand still reportedly outstrips the number of drivers, however, which is lower than in any year from 2005-2008.

MSC container ship in Long Beach, a biggie
The delivering system for moving containers from mega-ships operated by carrier alliances to cargo interests and truckers is antiquated and must change immediately if ports are to conquer their congestion problems, according to John McLaurin, president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association.

Grain is moving by rail at a steady pace from Canada’s Prairie Provinces to export terminals in British Columbia’s Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Thunder Bay.

The Port of Hamburg can no longer claim to be Europe’s second-largest container port.

Fruit exports from Chile and Peru are off to a promising start in 2015 thanks in large part to better weather and increasing demand from key overseas markets.

The Port of Savannah posted record container volumes in April, a potential sign that shippers who were once looking for a temporary haven from U.S. West Coast port disruption may have found a more permanent home on the East Coast.

The degree to which the Panama Canal expansion will alter the global cold chain is yet to be determined, but stakeholders are already seeing signs of a rise in business.

The number of tractor-trailers crossing U.S. borders rose 2.4 percent in the first quarter, following a 4 percent increase last year, according to Department of Transportation data. Border crossings between the U.S. and Mexico outpaced U.S.-Canadian truck traffic.

France’s River Seine port of Rouen has for a long time made a speciality of the north-south regular container trades, particularly those between northern Europe and west Africa. But the port no longer sees a future for itself as a major container port, not even as one specializing in the north Europe-Africa trades.

CMA CGM’s consolidated net profit soared to $406 million in the first quarter from $97 million a year ago as the French carrier capitalized on efficiency gains, cost cuts and sharply lower bunker prices.