William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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A proposal to mandate speed-limiting technology on heavy trucks would increase demand for truck drivers, U.S. regulators admit.

More from William B. Cassidy

Investors appear to be demanding more proof “Uber for Trucking” concepts actually will work.
Trucking companies of all types are being driven to take new and sometimes rough routes, as the growth of e-commerce, shifting consumer spending patterns, new regulations and technology create new...
Shippers say changes to the motor carrier bill of lading have shifted the burden of proof for negligence from motor carriers to shippers.
Two shipper groups are protesting changes to the uniform bill of lading, but does the U.S. Surface Transportation Board have the authority to intervene?
Target is just one of the many retailers and manufacturers grappling with the issue of inventory placement as e-commerce growth challenges logistics professionals.
Retailer tightens control over delivery times, flow of inventory from warehouses as e-commerce grows.
Shippers aware of the fragility of the demand imbalance in the truckload sector are voicing concerns with their trucking partners, carriers say.
Despite an uptick from June last month, lots of available trucks are likely to keep truckload and intermodal rates soft, Cass and Avondale Partners say.
The pilot program was part of the 2015 Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act and will ideally have roughly 200 members.
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration wants to test whether some under 21-year-old truck drivers are as safe as their older counterparts.
Retailers such as Wal-Mart want to reduce inventory while offering more products.
XPO in the second quarter recorded a profit, the first since CEO Bradley S. Jacobs took control of the company in 2011.
Refinancing saves XPO Logistics money that can be reinvested in "optimizing" its global business.
Lower economic activity and high inventories have sent spot market truckload rates tumbling even lower than they fell in 2015, and are not expected to disappear any time soon.
Whether the economy improves in the second half of 2016 or slides toward recession, trucking companies will have to travel in new directions, driven by high inventories, e-commerce, new regulations...