Reynolds Hutchins

Reynolds Hutchins is associate editor for JOC.com out of the journal’s Washington, D.C. bureau. He comes to The Journal of Commerce from Norfolk, Virginia — home to the state port and the largest naval station in the world — where he exclusively covered the maritime and transportation industries. His work has been quoted in the Associated Press and Washington Post. A long-time resident of Los Angeles, California and Wilmington, North Carolina, Hutchins calls Washington home now. He received a bachelor’s from Wake Forest University in English and political science, with an emphasis on the developing politics and economics of Mideast states. Before covering the transportation sector, Hutchins helmed the state and national politics desk at the single daily newspaper in Charlottesville, Virginia.
There is some contention over how much support the rollback has among shippers.

More from Reynolds Hutchins

Members of the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism account for over 54 percent, by value, of what is imported into the United States.
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Very little is known about Trump’s $1 trillion infrastructure plan.
The US Surface Transportation Board, the top rail regulatory agency, proposed a new rule in July that would permit so-called reciprocal switching. Now, however, the proposed rule might be derailed...
The Savannah industrial real estate market is in desperate need, the port authority says, after the area's vacancy rate was roughly halved last year, according to data from commercial real estate...
The transportation providers’ confidence has been spurred by an intermodal market that is improving.
A new tenant plans to build the largest-ever speculative building constructed in the area.
Shippers and intermediaries could deflect tens of millions of dollars of detention and demurrage fees.
Rising anti-trade rhetoric from the Trump administration has US East and Gulf Coast ports fearing they won't get money needed for dredging efforts.
President Trump's move raises questions about whether other rules might also be delayed or entirely derailed.