Peter Tirschwell, JOC Group executive vice president and chief content officer, is a prominent thought-leader in maritime transportation with more than 20 years as journalist and business leader at The Journal of Commerce.

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As of today, July 30, there is no U.S. West Coast longshore agreement in place, a month after the previous six-year pact expired. In any contract year, the time between expiration and agreement is especially volatile, because the risk of cargo-disrupting labor actions is at its highest. And the risk of disruption isn't diminishing.

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Clear sailing
Even though it now looks like it will be sometime in August before a new agreement between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and employers is in place, no one is panicking and tensions...
I’ve been arguing since early this year that international transportation is headed for trouble because of a variety of transportation-specific problems exacerbated by an improving economy that’s...
With the stroke of a pen on June 17, China transformed itself from a non-player among regulators of container shipping to the most important one. In the process, it belatedly took on a role...
Other than last week’s stunning collapse of the P3 Network, there’s arguably no hotter issue in the container shipping world than port productivity.
The rejection of the P3 shows how dominant the world’s largest carriers were set to become if their proposed mega-alliance took effect.
A Greek ship manager said it is working with Lloyd’s Register and Daewoo Shipbuilding to develop LNG-fueled ultra-large container ships of 14,000 TEUs.
Accelerating freight growth is raising questions about capacity at North American ports, the truckload market and other troublesome bottlenecks.
Robust April imports through several U.S. ports are at least partly related to initial effects of shippers accelerating import shipments to avoid potential disruption at West Coast ports tied to...
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which combined handle more than 40 percent of U.S. container trade, both reported double-digit monthly container import growth in April.
The driving public may not know it yet, but its sustained desire to eliminate the risk of fatal truck accidents is leading inexorably to a future of automated trucks on U.S. highways. Jarring as that...