Even before they endured four months of embarrassing and costly work slowdowns during contract negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association in 2014-15, California’s landlord container ports knew they had a congestion problem. They are now addressing the main cause of port congestion, which is outdated cargo-handling processes.

U.S. agriculture shouldn’t expect dramatic improvements in cargo-handling productivity to come out of the new West Coast longshore contract, said Ed DeNike, chief operating officer at SSA Marine, said the contract itself will not deliver productivity.

Truckload and less-than-truckload pricing expected to rise more quickly than freight volumes, as carriers seek to counter rising operating costs and shippers look to secure capacity.

U.S shippers and third-party logistics providers could see truckload rates increase by as much as 25 percent over the next two to three years, according to one of the heads of the largest privately held freight payment company in the U.S.

Trucking executives plan to invest more capital in trucks and to hire more workers over the next 12 months, a sign of their confidence in the economy and good news for shippers concerned about the availability of truck capacity in the year ahead.

The same congestion that snarled U.S. Pacific Coast ports earlier this year is headed for ports on the East Coast, a BNSF Railway executive warned earlier this week.

The Port of Rio de Janeiro's hopes for container growth are constrained by factors both technical and political.

Northern Nevada tops the list for shippers in advanced manufacturing interested in returning to or expanding existing facilities in the U.S., according to recent study from a national site-selection firm. And while the cost of logistics didn’t figure quantitatively into the firm’s ultimate rankings, total landed costs did.

The purchase of ReTrans, an intermodal and truck freight brokerage with more than $500 million in annual revenue, extends the reach of Kuehne + Nagel, the second-largest global 3PL, far beyond U.S. ports and into the nation's industrial heartland.

The plan to deepen Charleston’s harbor to accommodate the latest and largest container ships calling the U.S. East Coast received a key vote of approval.