Reynolds Hutchins

Reynolds Hutchins is associate editor for JOC.com out of the journal’s Washington, D.C. bureau. He comes to The Journal of Commerce from Norfolk, Virginia — home to the state port and the largest naval station in the world — where he exclusively covered the maritime and transportation industries. His work has been quoted in the Associated Press and Washington Post. A long-time resident of Los Angeles, California and Wilmington, North Carolina, Hutchins calls Washington home now. He received a bachelor’s from Wake Forest University in English and political science, with an emphasis on the developing politics and economics of Mideast states. Before covering the transportation sector, Hutchins helmed the state and national politics desk at the single daily newspaper in Charlottesville, Virginia.
For the first time, Savannah has more weekly trans-Pacific alliance services than the Port of New York and New Jersey.

More from Reynolds Hutchins

J.B. Hunt’s less optimistic outlook could be an early indicator of what to expect from Class I railroads and trucking companies’ first-quarter earnings to be released over the next several weeks.
Modest, sustained, and earlier-than-usual rate increases this spring in the spot market should be a canary in the coal mine for shippers with longer term contracts.
“I’m trying to think of a greenfield project right now that someone is actually building or financing, and I can’t think of one.”
The $6 billion deal announced Monday will establish Knight-Swift Transportation as the largest truckload operator in the United States.
“Yes, there is more money needed for it, but if we’re truly looking for projects that will have a meaningful payback to the nation, this is the project.”
The Federal Maritime Commission’s unanimous decision not to block the East Coast Gateway Port Terminal Agreement, the first of its kind in the United States, sets a precedent for port partnerships of...
Bigger ships simply don’t “fit” at ports on secondary north-south lanes, one maritime analyst says.
The Twill online portal, billed as a “virtual freight forwarder,” will go online Monday, but will only be available to UK shippers and then only those importing cargo from China.
Proposed Canadian legislation would allow EU-based carriers to reposition empty containers between domestic ports.
The original rulemaking announcement, however, did not include the new rule’s effective date.