TRANSPORT BRIEFS

TRANSPORT BRIEFS

DENVER AIRPORT FACES

HUGE OPERATING COST

DENVER - Mayor Wellington Webb's budget proposal of $154.6 million to operate Denver International Airport in its first year plus a debt load of $260.1 million means the airport must generate $141.7 million to break even, according to a published report.

But Jim DeLong, Denver aviation director, told the Denver Post that meeting the revenue projections at DIA will be a "slam dunk."

"We will make our revenue projections simply because the contracts with the airlines require the airlines to provide whatever revenue is necessary to cover our costs," Mr. DeLong said.

As a result, if revenue falls short from landing fees, fuel taxes, ground rentals, building rentals or concessions, the airlines must let the city increase landing fees and rental rates to cover the deficit, he said.

2 AIRLINES TAKE STAKES

IN NEW INDIAN CARRIER

MANAMA, Bahrain - Gulf Air and Kuwait Airways Corp. (KAC) each took a 20 percent share in Jet Airways, a new Indian airline that operates domestic flights.

Bahrain-based Gulf Air said in a statement on Monday that an agreement was signed in Bahrain with nonresident Indian firm Tail Winds, which now owns the remaining 60 percent of Jet Airways.

Jet Airways, launched in May, provides a domestic air taxi service between 12 destinations in India. It operates four Boeing 737-300s and plans to add four more to the fleet, the statement said.

Gulf Air is owned by the governments of Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates state of Abu Dhabi, while Kuwait owns KAC.

LOCKERBIE SUSPECTS

MAY GO TO US, UK

TUNIS, Tunisia - The Libyan lawyer for the two Lockerbie suspects said Monday they might agree to stand trial in the United States or Britain provided that further negotiations take place to secure a fair trial.

Asked whether there could be a trial in Scotland or in the United States, he said: "You can say 'could be, may be,' (it's) one of the possibilities. What I'm looking for is any possibility of a fair trial with human rights guarantees for the two suspects."

The lawyer, Ibrahim Legwell, said he had found "positive signs" in U.S. and British assurances on legal aspects of a trial for the suspects - two Libyan men suspected of planting explosives aboard a Pan Am airliner in 1988.