West Coast Labor Disputes

Relations between members of the International Longshoremen and Warehouse Union and waterfront employers on the U.S. West Coast have heated up over the past couple years, with protests and other actions in the Pacific Northwest and at ports in California.

The two parties are currently in negotiations for a new contract to replace the one slated to expire on June 30, 2014. For our continuing coverage of the negotiations, visit our ILWU Labor Negotiations page.

News & Analysis

05 Aug 2017
ILWU three-year contract extension is now official
12 Jan 2015
Importers and exporters who ship through the Port of Portland, Oregon, will experience higher costs next month because of work slowdowns by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union.
09 Jan 2015
Drayage drivers at Shippers Transport Express, a subsidiary of SSA Marine, on Friday chose to make Teamsters Local 848 in Southern California their exclusive bargaining representative, making Shippers Transport the second trucking company at Los Angeles-Long Beach after Toll to be represented by the trucker union.
BNSF container train
07 Jan 2015
BNSF Railway is lifting its embargo on interchanging westbound ocean containers headed to U.S. West Coast on-dock facilities two days after the railroad implemented the ban.
06 Jan 2015
After months of appeals from industry groups, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service this week became involved in West Coast contract negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association. Here’s a guide to the FMCS and its role in collective bargaining.
05 Jan 2015
In a major breakthrough, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union on Monday agreed to federal mediation to resolve contract negotiations that are now in their eighth month.

Commentary

Contract extension talks between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association must address productivity issues in a serious way so US West Coast ports get somewhere remotely close to the efficiency at other major ports in the world. 

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