Top 25 Truckload Companies

The combined revenue of the 25 largest U.S. truckload carriers fell 1 percent to $26.9 billion, according to The Journal of Commerce’s 2017 list of the Top 25 TL Carriers, prepared by SJ Consulting Group. That compares with a 2.2 percent decrease in 2015, when those truckers had $27.2 billion in sales. Fifteen of the Top 25 Truckload Carriers saw revenue decline, as truckload rates tanked and lower fuel prices and surcharges took a bite out of their business. The JOC and SJ Consulting Group annually rank the 25 largest truckload companies by revenue — which account for a small amount of total truckload revenue — and track their progress on this special topic page.

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Special Coverage

Truckload carriers of all sizes and types suffered in last year’s freight slump, but they did not suffer equally.

News & Analysis

Werner reports strong demand for freight servics — and means rates are headed higher.
30 Jan 2018
US shippers and other e-commerce parties take note: freight demand, still strong in January, will raise contract rates in the coming quarters, truckload carrier Werner Enterprises has warned.
20 Dec 2017
With its heavy-duty Semi, Tesla is one of several companies hoping to electrify trucking, and it is attracting orders from shippers as well as carriers.
18 Dec 2017
This is certain regarding the trucking industry in 2018: it will be the year of time management, as the electronic logging mandate makes supply chains less and less flexible while freight demand rises.
15 Dec 2017
Spot rates for truckload, intermodal services keep rising, putting pressure on contract rates that may last well into 2018.
14 Dec 2017
James Welch, the executive credited with saving one of the largest less-than-truckload companies, will retire next July, as economic growth buoys the LTL business.
13 Nov 2017
False logs are an "epidemic," and shippers are vulnerable, speakers tell the JOC Inland Distribution Conference. The latest federal data back them up.

Commentary

Using predictive analytics, the Port of Montreal this year will alert drayage drivers when it looks as if truck turn times will be long, and use data collected on terminal gate movements to lessen the impact of rail switching on trucks.

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